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  1. Most of my field trips tend to be work related, but at least it takes me to some pretty cool and occasionally remote locations in northern BC. This is between Bob Quinn and Bell 2, BC, roughly 100 miles due east of Wrangell, AK. So many bears here, typically seeing 7-10 black bears a day and a handful of grizzlies over the shift. Closest reported sighting to here is this - from 2 years ago and about 100 miles south: https://www.bfro.net/GDB/show_report.asp?id=65630 Very few people in this country and most places on the map aren't even towns, just gas stations/camps or lodges.
    11 points
  2. Two weeks ago, I spent a week in the High Uinta Mountains of Utah, camping and hiking with some friends. It is a beautiful area with easy access to high alpine lakes from the Mirror Lake Scenic Byway (Hwy. 150). While the trip was not a BF focused trip, I was fully aware of several BF reports around several of the lakes we visited. I also was aware of the claim by some Utah BF researchers, that the Weber River drainage was a hot-spot. Thus, I decided to take one my hikes overlooking the Weber River drainage and to follow a similar path as one of the BFRO reports (see link below). http://www.bfro.net/GDB/show_article.asp?id=188 In this report, two men and their 5 boys, claimed to have hiked to the top of the ridge between Pass Lake and Cuberant Basin at the head of Weber River drainage. When they reached the top of the ridge they looked down upon a small alpine lake about one half mile below and saw the BF like creature standing on its edge. While I don't know exactly where they were, if they were at the ridge above Cuberant Lake, that was about 11,000 ft and Cuberant Lake was down at 10,400 ft. I did not climb the ridge. Instead I followed the trail from Pass Lake to the largest of the Cuberant Lakes in order to see the Weber River drainage to my west and check out one pond and 2 of the Cuberant Lakes. Below is a map extract showing were Pass Lake TH, Cuberant Lake, Fish Lake and Notch Mountain are located. That morning it was 48 F at 9:30 AM and had rained all morning. Thus the dark clouds on the photos. It did not rain anymore until after 2:30 PM. The first photo is of Notch Mountain and the 2nd photo is an unnamed mountain. Both of these were to the west of our position and you can see the Weber River drainage down below. The 3rd photo shows the hike down from the pass into the pond on the way to the Cuberant Lakes. Fourth photo is the first Cuberant Lake and the 5th photo is the largest of the Cuberant Lakes. Overall the whole area is beautiful and I will probably return (with a backpack and to go deeper).
    10 points
  3. Gosh, thank you. This is a great forum, one I've enjoyed immensely. I appreciate every member and poster. Keep on 'squatchin.'
    9 points
  4. The discussion seems to draw from the description (from the book "Other Origins" ) of how the giganto model was made, and the quotes are reasonably correct. The only error, which Dr. Ciochon made himself, was to say he sought me out, when it was I, looking for anthropologists to team with, found him and made the inquiry about a collaboration. But generally the material in the video is correct. The full scale model was indeed a hypothetical design, given we don't have any fossil material but jawbones and teeth. And it was assumed to be a quardaped, and only posed standing up to show off it's true body size, not to suggest it was bipedal. The one arm was raised to suggest it was standing to reach for some kind of fruit. For the record, I don't consider Giganto as a relative of sasquatch. Based on the PGF figure, I personally think she is a hominid, derived from some relic human form such as paranthapus boisei or early neanderthal. Bill
    9 points
  5. https://www.thewrap.com/finding-bigfoot-the-search-continues-discovery-plus-video/ Well, the guys from Finding Bigfoot are back to make BF TV great again lol. I know a lot of people have their issues with BF TV but this was one of the best times ive had in years. Getting to go out on the overnight, in my research area, with the crew was amazing. I dont know about the other 2 locations they visit on the show but i know mine was red hot that night. I never go in guns blazing, im a passive observer in this area, but having the crew doing their quick and dirty methods to initiate responses paid off that night. Go check it out on Discovery+ FEB 8th.
    9 points
  6. I managed to get out for a half day adventure today. I wasn't sure the trails would be passable after yesterday's strong winds, but I didn't encounter any downed trees, just tons of leaves and bits of evergreen boughs littered everywhere. I chose one of my favorite trails off the Harrison East FSR, a branch road that I managed to bag a nice fork horn buck on a few years ago. That luck didn't hold today, as all I saw was squirrels and small birds, plus one small member of the weasel family that played peekaboo with me in a pile of broken rock for a few minutes, from about 4 yards away. There have been at least 5 sightings in this area in the last decade, that I'm aware of, but I couldn't find any sign today. I spent the last hour of daylight glassing a fairly large clearcut that was logged about 5 years ago, then had a forest fire burn through 3 years ago. It was a pleasant way to spend the last bit of a nice day, but nothing at all came into sight before it got too dim to see well. During the 4 hours I was off the main FSR, I didn't see or hear another person or vehicle, which was a surprise, as the parking area at the end of pavement had more empty ATV trailers than I've ever seen there before.
    9 points
  7. Up a little ways N yesterday for some bog trotting in an area about centrally located between 2 sightings of very differently described creatures, tall, lanky reddish haired adult with shorter assumed juvenile crossing the road and a dark colored, stout individual sighted from a canoe as it stepped up onto a shoreline boulder. About 20 miles apart as the crow flies. Didn't see any BF sign but plenty of color and Northern Pitcher plant: walking old woods roads, giant lichen/moss covered glacial erratics back in here along with old bear tracks crossed a few streams on the way, this was the only misty one: Ran video a bit of the drive out for the hail mary road crossing...
    9 points
  8. Truer words were never spoken. Do I think that conventions and Bigfoot celebrities cause damage to the larger cause? No. Do I think that these strange people who try to become self appointed gatekeepers of the topic cause damage to the larger cause? Yes. If they had their way, only ‘serious researchers’ such as themselves would be permitted to speak about certain things, and free public discourse would be controlled or eliminated. Bitter, self-appointed experts who constantly demand that others be quiet and bow to their wisdom turn away more potential enthusiasts than Mountain Monsters. And one of those enthusiasts might just be the one to prove Bigfoot’s existence someday. I used to rail against BFRO paid expeditions on this forum, until a couple of members were kind enough to take the time to explain an opposing point of view to me. Just because I don’t find any personal value in those things doesn’t mean that other people shouldn’t have the opportunity to enjoy them if they so desire. At the end of the day, it exposes more people to the subject, many of whom are not able to do what we would define as field research themselves. Real field research is hot, dirty, expensive, time consuming, frustrating, and sometimes dangerous. Just because someone can’t or isn’t willing to endure all of that, doesn’t mean that they can’t have an interest in the subject…even if the version that they are interested in doesn’t necessarily reflect my own experiences. When the shut-in on Facebook starts to lecture you on Bigfoot behavior…just laugh and move on. There’s too many windmills out there to tilt with, so why bother? And if you do argue with them and successfully impose your own viewpoint…well, congratulations. There’s only a few million more out there, so you better get cracking if you want everyone to think the same way as you. At the end of the day, the person who wants to pay to go on a BFRO expedition has absolutely zero effect on me or my efforts. Nor does a little grandmother who collects Bigfoot memorabilia. Nor does a Bigfoot celebrity who brings out his own branded ‘Monster Hot Sauce’. I personally find it a bit cringe, but people might think the same way about me. And I don’t want those people to have the ability to limit or control my actions or speech concerning Sasquatch…so I will afford them the same courtesy. The idea of subjective control of the discussion seems to be appealing to a disturbing number of forum participants these days. I went to the Smokey Mountain conference, mainly because I enjoy watching Paulides give his presentation and I wanted to hear Ron Morehead speak. I approached it with a certain level of hesitancy given some of the participants. I ended up having a ball. A lot of it didn’t appeal to me, but I enjoyed being there and talking to some of the attendees…even the ones who I find to be polar opposite of me on the subject. Enjoyed the heck out of it, and even ended up buying some Cryptid related patches off of a kid who had a table there…just because I found his enthusiasm for the subject infectious. At the end of the day, if you think that Matt Moneymaker and someone’s grandma who collects Bigfoot tchotchkes is going to prevent the eventual proof of these creatures, or if you find yourself bitterly stewing over their very existence…maybe reflect a little upon why you are allowing others to affect you to such a degree. At the end of the day, this subject and it’s pursuit is supposed to be something that brings us joy. If you find yourself hating the subject and everything or anyone involved with it…yet are still involved because you feel that you and you alone can solve the mystery…then I don’t know what to tell you, other than maybe request that you don’t constantly attempt to poison the subject for the rest of us. No one person is ever going to completely control the narrative. This isn’t the day of the Four Horsemen, were only a comparative handful of people were conversant on the subject. There are more YouTube channels and podcasts than you could shake a stick at…. Most of them aren’t my cup of tea, but I don’t have an innate desire to control what others say, hear, or do…so I don’t care. And if you do care? More power to you. I only answered because you asked, and now I will continue my day free from the worry that Matt Moneymaker might be out there somewhere doing something that I disagree with.
    8 points
  9. This past weekend my "brother from another mother" Bill and I did our annual backpacking trip. Usually we go into a particular basin and do bigfooting things. This year that whole area was smoked out by wildfires upwind so we stirred things up a bit. We hiked into Blue Canyon Basin in the Sky Lakes Wilderness. It is a broad, shallow glacial cirque in the head of the South Fork of Rogue River in the Cascade Range between Crater Lake to the north and Mt McLoughlin in the south. There was fairly heavy haze as we left town but it got better as we neared Blue Canyon trailhead. The trailhead is on top of a ridge. From the TH the trail drops steadily but gradually to valley floor passing one lake on the canyon wall and meeting at several at the canyon bottom. To that point the trail is heavily traveled but gets less traffic depending on which direction you choose. We headed east past some lakes under the back rim of the cirque. We passed the turnoff to Blue Canyon Lake which hangs high on the back wall of the cirque. (We came back to this trail and used it getting out of the basin .. more of that later.) On the way in we passed Horseshoe and Pear Lakes, climbed a low ridge, and dropped past Dee Lake to Island Lake. My intent was to camp at Dee Lake but we missed it ... out of sight of the trail. Though I had never been there I recognized Island Lake when we arrived. We set up camp at Island Lake, filtered some water, ate dinner, and went to bed not long after dark. Sometime not much later the wind blew what was left of the smoke out of the basin and we had a great view of stars, Jupiter, and later the moon. Saturday AM we woke up to this at Island Lake: ... no smoke!! NONE!! We got up fairly early but it was after 9:00 a by the time we had breakfast and broke camp. The day stayed clear, at least up high, but heated up a bit. We reversed course and headed back with intent to take a different trail up out of the basin. We stopped at Pear Lake for a while, then after a short walk, we stopped for lunch and a nap beside Horseshoe Lake: After a break we hiked the last half mile to the junction with the Blue Canyon Lake trail. At that junction, the fun ended and the work began. Trails within the basin were fairly level and more or less maintained. The Blue Canyon Lake trail was neither. The lake is about 2/3 of the way up the trail to the ridge but off a few hundred yards through some gnarly brush. There had been some maintenance attempted as far as the lake. It ended there. Also the yellowjackets, which had been noticeably absent, began there. We stopped about where we figured lake level should be and I bushwhacked to the lake. It was not a fun bushwhack. The lake was pretty gross. The water looked clear but the lake bottom seemed coated with a bright yellow-green plant layer. There were no obvious camping spots. I decided we should move on. The last 1/3 of the trail to the ridge, along with the Cat Hill Way trail which ran along the ridge 2.5 miles or so back to my truck, was littered with fallen logs and had a lot of impinging brush .. mostly huckleberry. That whole section was overrun with yellowjackets as well. I almost stepped in one ground nest. No stings, but .. close. From the trailhead, we drove back to where we had cell service, phoned home / checked in with Bill's wife and my GF, then drove to where he usually parks his trailer in hunting season and camped one more night to finish off the mountain house, etc. Good trip. No bigfoot. No tracks. No vocalizations (though I have not reviewed the audio recording from the night yet). No heavy "vibe" as the research area gets when they are around. Time to start figuring out something for next year ...
    8 points
  10. Doing great on Sturgeon in the Wilamette!
    8 points
  11. You could have saved me a lot of typing by just stating you are a JREFer. I thought I was having a legitimate conversation.
    8 points
  12. This morning I went to an area I go to on occasion that is a hair south of one of my favorite places. It has ponds, steep hills, and lots of wildlife. I was poking around areas that were wet and came upon one area where I saw a print. It was mostly submerged but had the classic footprint shape. I took several pictures of it which I've included below. As you will see, there is a lot of leaf litter this time year so prints are not as clearly defined as they would without leaves. I spent a fair amount of time trying to find other prints and think I may have seen another one but it had more compressed debris making print edges very difficult to discern. The first print I found looks fairly long but there being so much water I can't know for sure that it wasn't both a front and back bear print. Whatever it was, it was very interesting.
    8 points
  13. Last Saturday, I finally got out in the H3 to an area I hadn't visited in about 20 years. It involves a steep climb up one creek drainage, a traverse along a very rough ridgeline trail, and an even steeper descent down the next creek drainage to the north. Total distance is not much more than 10km (6.2mi), but it took from 11AM to 4Pm to drive that distance, with stops to check for tracks and scat. It was overcast and showery all day, with a smattering of snow along the 6,000 ft. ridge, but even the limited views were great, looking down on the Chilliwack River valley on one side of the ridge, and the Fraser Valley and the town of Chilliwack on the other side. A couple of washed out bear tracks were the the only signs of wildlife for the day.
    8 points
  14. Wynoochee lake area-Donkey creek Queets river drainage Kalaloch area Found one track that wasn't hoofed. Bear maybe coming off the bank to the road. No elk but lots of sign. Glassed clear cuts last night until the ocean mist rolled in around 8 pm. Access is tough. Timber ground is all locked up. Olympic NF roads are all grown over or kelly humped. But State DNR ground was good access and plenty of clear cuts. Made a big loop on dirt about 30 miles and then when we were almost out hit a road closed sign and construction. I wasnt going back the way I came. So I moved the signs knowing the crew went home the same way I was going. It was just woods to my back. My wife wasnt amused but we went through the construction equipment and popped out on pavemet on other side. I have a bear tag but its too warm in my opinion.
    7 points
  15. Today at my work, a young kid (about 6 or so) saw my Bigfoot figure and started asking me a bit about it as he too liked Squatchy stuff. We made small talk and I mentioned I was glad I wasn't Bigfoot today as I would be hot under all that hair. He told me they were going to the lake to play in the water and he was going to watch for Bigfoot because he probably liked to play in the water too to cool off...just like his dog in the his backyard wading pool. It tickled me a youngster was even thinking about it. Nope...not a hot topic (no pun intended). But just something sort of amusing today and you know...he is probably right.
    7 points
  16. Well, getting the research year to a bit of a slow start here in WV until last weekend. We were supposed to head out to this site the weekend the report came in but we had a state wide ice storm that had us crippled for 6 days. We finally got on sote on Feb 27th and have been processing data since. This new research location is perfect IMO. 85 years worth of history, sightings of white BF and most recently, Feb 13th some Ohio howl like sounds were recorded. The biggest plus is the massive variety of food literally EVERYWHERE you turn. A family could easily rough it out there and survive fairly easily as thif family has for nearly a century. The witness was getting hounded but luckly recognized me, and trusted we would treat her encounter and the stories she had respectfully. We spent a day surveying the area cataloguing the food supply, fresh/clean water sources etc. Our witness also has some activity 2 days before we arrived where her husband claimed something had thrown gravel at him while he was taking the trash out. Nothing but a large well worn game trail to be found near the trash though, as expected. What wasn't expected though was the track way we found just before we left the site for the day. 5 deep impressions in the ground, most were in the recently sown grass and hay, but 2 were half in a creek and one just on the edge of a mountian stream, where it left toe impressions that had collected water from the previous rain that had come through. We cast the track and documented the others. The gaite ranged between 4.5ft and 5ft heres the one track that we were able to collect. A tuft of grass eliminated the ball of the foot, and some mud from the stream had been left in the footprint as well whoch is visible in the image of the print prior to casting. We documented the entire day using Video, 2 Audio recorders, and multiple cameras for stills. The full video will be up soon and I'll share it here Other footprints were found on the property but were in deep leaf litter and nondescript but worth noting.
    7 points
  17. So far, what are our possible explanations as to how they can sense and avoid ir cams: 1) They can see the ir illumination. However, apes (and mammals in general) cannot see in the ir range due to their body heat. 2) They can smell either the cameras or batteries. Primates, however, have a less developed sense of smell as a trade off to heightened Visio and sense of touch. 3) They can hear the camera itself. However again, primates hear in the same range as humans…maybe slightly higher on some cases. 4) They are so in tune with their immediate environment that they can instantly recognize something out of the ordinary and instinctively avoid it. This seems to run counter to the claims that these creatures are exceedingly inquisitive and curious. They can’t resist checking out humans at a campfire, but know to avoid the small box on a tree? That curiosity would eventually result in one with exceptionally poor decision making skills being captured peeking at the strange new box on a tree… 5) They can sense the emf emissions from the camera. There has been some discussion over whether deer can sense the electromagnetism given off by hunters. I am looking to see if any claims of this emf detection has been documented in monkeys or other primates, but haven’t seen anything so far. Camera traps are kind of in the same category as road crossings for me. These things need to maintain a 100% success rate…year after year. It seems impossible, but they do. This doesn’t sound like an ape to me. But, if it is closer to man with man’s intelligence… then where is the tool use? The fire use? There isn’t one ‘rebel’ that makes an attempt to break the taboo and communicate with the hairless ones? At this point you are talking about a creature that has a wide array of super senses (far beyond what any other creature on earth possesses), intelligence somewhat equal to a man but without man’s tool use, and an almost hive mind that allows these intelligent beings to remain in complete lockstep 100% of the time concerning their interaction with humans. Couple this with the physical gifts that they possess...strength, speed, agility, stealth. And now throw in the proposed ability to use emf in ways that the rest of animal kingdom lacks… We are dealing with something so far outside of what the rest of the animal kingdom is capable of, that it’s a surprise that these things didn’t just predate early man into extinction. We are missing something major here. None of this makes sense.
    7 points
  18. Regardless of any scandalous admissions, by anybody, the empirical evidence in the PGF validates the conclusion it was a real spontaneous filming event of a real biological entity, not a filmed hoax of a man in a fur costume. Any claim, any recollection, any admission about the events of and surrounding the PGF must be tested against the film evidence, and cannot change the facts captured on the film images. Any testimony must be evaluated with consideration for a motive to lie, or a failed memory mis-representing the true events. I personally think that when people talk of (or hint at or suggest) some pending revelation will change or discredit the PGF, they are just indulging in wishful thinking. No harm in doing so, but that's what it is, nothing more.
    7 points
  19. I can't believe that I am wading into this train wreck of a thread, but... I don't even comprehend what a lot of you are trying to propose. We want to get rid of the infighting and bickering in the community and become a united front...but, then immediately begin to talk about how a large segment of people immediately need to be shut out due to their theories. If you are just looking for flesh and blood, no-kill folks who are going to actually do anything more than the usual wood knock, howl, 'let's leave a bag of marbles on this stump'...then rinse and repeat...good luck. If someone wants to actually put a body on the slab and prove it, or if they have had any other strange things happen to them while they were in the field...take a hike. That's unity all right. I have just skimmed through this thread, but so far the ideas seem to go like this...well funded, organized teams in the field spending extended periods of time conducting research. Established professionals in the scientific community who back the investigation who are committed to the search for Bigfoot. Almost everyone who is involved in this has to fund it out of their own pockets and have to balance their field time with the demands of real life. I am out more often than many other people...and it is a part time pursuit for me by necessity. I guess that I could all in and end up living in a shack like Dahinden, but I guess that I am not that dedicated to the cause. Short of getting that mythical deep pocket patron who wants to set you up with equipment and then pay you a stipend for looking for Sasquatch...the only way to devote yourself full time to this sort of thing is to make it self funding. Heaven forbid that someone tries that, because then they are going to be attacked as 'selling out'. Write a book, make a podcast, star in a show...and this forum will freaking release the hounds and go after you. I understand that I am saying this on a forum of grown men (and women) who devote a large percentage of their time to the study and pursuit of something that the general public doesn't believe exists...but, I have to wonder how much of this stuff is based in reality as opposed to some sort of live action role play type of fantasy. It's the same thing that we saw in the thread where we were discussing a possible BFF youtube channel. Things immediately went out of the realm of actual possibility into this weird sort of fantasy land. 'Hey, let's each shoot a clip and then cut them together into a single video to showcase the field investigators on the forum'. That somehow morphed into livestreams from the woods (who has signal out there?), celebrity hosts, etc. It's like it is just a fantasy to indulge yourself in as opposed to building something that might actually be possible. Same thing with the eDNA thread. Lots of conjecture and grandiose plans, but nothing actionable ever came of it...because it got too complicated. Here's an eDNA plan. Get a group of people in different areas around the country who agree to follow established and agreed upon eDNA collection procedures and commit to gathering possible samples for study. Find a lab who is open to testing the samples. Determine the price and then determine if we have the resources. If the resources are available, the members involved then collect samples as they are able and then the samples are sent in for testing. The results are shared openly with the forum. Bam. Done. There's your plan. From the what I can make out, a lot of the discussion here is how can the members of this forum work together to strategically to bring us closer to discovery. To some degree, it already does that. At least it does for me. I communicate with a handful of other field researchers who I would not have otherwise connected with. We bounce ideas off of one another, give each other recommendations for equipment or practices in the field. Skinwalker has been a wellspring of knowledge...especially in the area of casting. Of course, this communication takes place via messages as opposed to open discussion on the forum, but that is due to necessity. The reality of the situation is...we have a handful of people who are involved in a varying degrees of field research or the categorization and recording of data related to the phenomena. We are scattered across North America and few if any of us are able to devote long periods of time in the field in different parts of the country. We are not going to fund any groups of researchers to be in the field for any length of time. Unless some of you have been holding out on sharing it, we don't have any billionaires as members here. We are not going to collectively convince any scientists that Bigfoot exists...not with a letter writing campaign and honestly not with some poop in a plastic bag that might come back as having human DNA in it and as a result be immediately labeled as tainted. Scientists are paid to do science...and unless their employer is paying them to look into Bigfoot, then the best that we can hope for is that an occasional one will have some personal interest in the topic and will utilize some of their personal expertise and resources to look into it. We are not going to set up elaborate, expensive operations. It's just not going to happen. If you think so, please refer to the Youtube thread that I referenced earlier. Here. You want a plan to utilize the resources of this forum to advance the search for Sasquatch? Encourage communication and the sharing of information between the members here who are actively involved in field research. Set up a reporting function independent of the BFRO where witnesses can inform us of recent sightings. Gigantor has already started this. The BFF is an established entity that doesn't take full advantage of its name recognition in the field. Take advantage of it and have this be an alternative to the BFRO or some crappy Bigfoot Facebook page. Establish which researchers are available for each region to possibly investigate those sightings. Have those researchers share the results of their investigation here with their peers. Each researcher is still independent and does not need to conform to one single style of investigation or even one single belief in the origin of the phenomenon. If funding is available, use it strategically on projects that will give us the most bang for our buck...like the eDNA testing or the Researcher of the Year contest...knowing that those projects may only enable the eventual discovery as opposed to some sort of Bigfoot proof silver bullet. When those projects are decided upon by the forum, put volunteer members in charge of the planning and execution. We always seem to suffer from all chiefs, no Indians. Keep it simple. All of these things are doable. All of these things are realistic. They are not as glamorous as some of the ideas floated here and will more than likely not result in some sort of immediate acceptance or proof of the phenomenon. But, they are REALISTIC.
    7 points
  20. Here we go, finnaly got the video finished for the wineberry site investigation. Follow the link below if you want to check it out! https://youtu.be/yRtPygAd5Kg
    7 points
  21. I am still waiting for them to appear 🙃
    7 points
  22. Just got back from spending 2 weeks on the Maine Downeast coast. The coolest thing was on the rocks at the shore line. I think it was waiting for us to get there. It was about 7 ft. tall and quite a work of art like I've never seen. The only thing holding it together was gravity, two days later the wind kicked up to 40 mph! and blew "Poseidon" over: And then the wind toppled it over:
    7 points
  23. I had a good "Sasquatch Day" today, starting with a breakfast with 4 local researchers and wives in a restaurant for the first time in over a year, followed with an afternoon sortie into the mountains to check out a couple of lakes N.E. of Mission, BC. I arrived at the first lake about 3:30, after parking on the logging road and making a short, steep, muddy hike down a rough trail to the shore. I found lots of tracks on the soft mud of the beach, but all of them were human and dog, nothing at all that hinted of Sasquatch. I returned to the 4x4, and continued deeper into the mountains, on a much rougher stretch of disused logging road, with speed reduced to 10km/hr. due to deep potholes, lots of rocks, and a rather sketchy looking old bridge, but did not reach the second lake target, as it was getting too late for me to make it the rest of the way there, and still get home by the time I had promised my invalid wife. That one will wait for another time, when I can devote a whole day to the task. It was great to be able to have an indoor social gathering for the first time in ages, and as always, refreshing to body and mind to get out in woods for a while.
    6 points
  24. I happen to have an interest in all matters related to Jack The Ripper. Exactly who was the most famous mass murderer of all times? There is a forum where exceedingly knowledgable people post questions, or information, and others, similarly endowed, provide answers or opinions---much like here. Were I to go on the Ripper website and, right from the start, make claims that I had thousands of pages of Ripper documents and photographs, I would be met with a healthy bit of skepticism. Those claims are received much differently from someone who has presented himself/herself and has become known to those similarly-minded people on the forum. For those who may remember, in the 1980s there was an EF Hutton TV commercial telling folks they did it the old fashion way. They earned your trust. So it is with many aspects of life. In my opinion, the bigger the claim, the more responsibility one bears especially when you haven't introduced yourself to your fellow readers. Who doesn't wish to be courted before being asked?
    6 points
  25. Date & Time - Saturday, July 25, 2021 from 11am to 530pm Location - Diamond Peak Wilderness, Oregon Cascades Weather - 80's, slight breeze, some smoke from distant fires, sunshine What Happened- NorthWind and I went to check out a site. Last week while hiking, we spoke with two campers who had something making unidentifiable noises around their tent after tossing boulders down the mountain side. So we hiked four miles in to the further, upper lake to see for ourselves. We found everything just as they said, and could see the potential. We both felt uneasy, like we were being watched, a couple of times. But, it was mostly just an absolutely gorgeous place to eat lunch and lounge lakeside for a few houres. I'm pretty dang proud of myself for doing an eight mile hike, the longest to date. A year ago, I was diagnosed with breast cancer and wondered if I'd be here this year! So, while we found nothing of note (except two great future camp sites), it was a good day in the woods. We hiked in behind that distant mountain! You can see the boulders beyond me, across the lake. One of the campsites, the one the campers used and heard the sounds. A great creek at the halfway, fill your water bottle, point.
    6 points
  26. Little update from the 3D research tool I am working on... The actual terrain data from Google is now in my 3D application and I have a 3D model in a very early stage now. I will start from now on to fine tune the landscape to get a scene as it was in 1967. A lot of work is waiting but I am confident to find every information I need in this awesome database here and I am looking forward to verify the result with all the data from the work other researches. Here a little clip to give an idea what I have in mind...
    6 points
  27. I actually have quite a bit of Bigfoot/Sasquatch related figurines and such. Taken about a decade to amass this collection. Not everything is pictured. Have a while bunch of digital books. Have some physical books too (used to have more, but sold a lot, thinking of selling the rest). And there's a few other things that are sitting in a box in the laundry room because I don't have space for them right now. Part 1... Part 2. While I love it all, the last statue pictured is probably my prized piece...
    6 points
  28. Here's a shot of Mt. Baker taken from my patio at 8:20 this evening, and a little story about my first drive up the mountain back about 1964. Myself, my new bride, and another young newlywed couple made our first trip up Baker in my '49 Ford, at about this time of year. The drive to the resort was interesting, with great scenery, and lots of snow alongside the road at the higher elevations. After a lunch and making snow angels, we started back down the very twisty road, following a green VW beetle. At the 3rd or 4th hairpin turn, the VW hit an icy patch, spun 360 degrees, and punched through the snowbank on the downhill side of the road, disappearing over the edge. The ladies screamed, and I managed to pull over and stop without meeting the same fate. George and I got out and went to the edge of the snowbank to see if we could do anything, while the girls flagged traffic around my car on the narrow road. When we looked down the hill, the VW was sitting in snow up to the windows, having literally flown 20' out and 30' down, without touching the snow in between! As the 2 of us started down the very steep dropoff, we saw 2 people, a young man and woman, emerge from the passenger side window, as the doors were blocked by the snow. We got down to them, determined that there were no real injuries, and we all struggled back up to the roadway in waist deep snow, soaking wet by the time we got there. After all piling into my car, and cranking the heater up, we discussed the plan of action, finally deciding to drive to the base of the mountain to call for a tow truck, and allow the young man to call his Dad to tell him where his VW was. I left them at the service station to wait for the tow, and a ride home to Seattle, while our 2 couples drove back to Surrey, BC, with the heater blasting to dry us out. I've been back there a few times since, including on a Honda Silver Wing, which was great fun on that road in the summer, and always recall that incident on the hairpin turn.
    6 points
  29. I managed to "almost" finish the route I failed to complete last Sunday. Today was a beautiful warm spring day, so I headed out to try the Silver Skagit route again. The roadblock at km 26 was gone, and just beyond it, the after effects of what must have been a killer windstorm were evident, with not dozens, but hundreds of tree stubs along each side of the road where work crews had removed all the trees blocking the route, and many hundreds more were down in the forest. A campsite that our group has used in the past is blocked by trees down just yards off the main road, so I continued to the alternate that we used a few times about 10 km. further along. About 2 sq.km. around it are charred by a forest fire, and it looks like a war zone. Just a short 100 m or so down the road on the other side I did find a trail into a nice clearing that's big enough for 3 or 4 trucks to park and camp. I found bones there, most looked deer size, but there were 2 oddballs, large ribs that had been cut at one end. I carried on into the Provincial Park, and saw another large burn, starting at the east side of the road and going right up the side of the mountain. The road was gated just before the large campsite at Ross Lake, so I had to turn around there. Before heading back, I walked across a cable supported footbridge across the Skagit River to a meadow area some 700 yards into the forest on the other side to stretch my legs from the bumpy drive. There was a fair bit of traffic, and most roadside clear spots had campers or day trippers in them. Burned campsite Possible new campsite, where bones were found Bones Oversize ribs, cut at one end Footbribge across the Skagit, just upstream from Ross L View downstream
    6 points
  30. My book about Port Chatham will be released this month. I'm having an online release party if any of you are interested. We will be giving away copies of the book and other fun stuff. Here is a link for the Facebook release party: https://fb.me/e/13zr5kVTq It will also be live on Youtube and hopefully, Instagram. March 20th 2021 at 3pm AKDT.
    6 points
  31. Camped last Saturday night in one of the quietest places I can remember. One Pileated woodpecker and a couple of others and that was it. Found a large track way but we're pretty sure it was melted out Moose tracks. Distance between toe-to-toe was about 48"-51+" so ruled out Black Bear. Still a bit early for them anyway: The tracks themselves weren't all that well defined: On the way into the second campsite on Sunday we had to cross a causeway connecting two bogs. We scoped out the site and then walked around to do some exploring. Nothing, and so we drove out with me following and I stopped on the causeway with my windows down to listen. From pretty far away out my passenger window I heard four knocks- like someone chopping wood (not gun shots)- followed by a pause, a single knock followed by a pause, and then three more knocks and quiet for then on. I had no cell service so had to catch up to my buddy and we both came back to listen further but there was nothing and so drove out. My researcher friend wasn't staying the second night so left later and I went back in and re-crossed the causeway and camped for the night. Monday morning I packed up and again stopped on the causeway to listen, but this time I had a cheap video recorder going when I stepped out of the truck. Wouldn't you know, I was able to capture a single knock that was closer than the one the previous. Only one. It felt good that I at least this time I got this one knock on record. This was my first time EVER for getting any kind of evidence whether it be tracks, knocks, tree falls, or stick structures. None of that has ever happened before. Now it was warming up when that knock sound happened so it could have been a section of tree thawing out or ice expanding on the bog but since the day before saw a series of similar, more rapid occurrences it leaves the question open as to the source of the single one the following day. Both incidents happened at about the same time of day with the second event much closer than the first. Here is a short audio with the truck noise cleaned up followed by a image of the sonogram: Possible BF Knock.mp3
    6 points
  32. I'll repeat what I've said before. Patty is the female appropriate to the male I saw in '76. Patty is the mother appropriate to the juvenile I saw in 2013. All were different, not identical, but biologically aligned with the correct differences and similarities. They were not hoaxes. I do not believe the PGF is a hoax but if it was, how did those cowboys manage to create a suit, out of materials that didn't exist yet, to so perfectly fit with what I saw? Until someone answers that to my satisfaction, I can't take the notion of the PGF being a hoax seriously in any practical way. MIB
    6 points
  33. Science has spoken, it needs physical evidence. THIS IS THE 800LBS GORILLA IN THE ROOM. A single tooth or pinky bone is more valuable than 10,000 foot casts or 10,000 PGF’s. The evidence doesn’t get heavier and heavier to science as the numbers grow. There IS a line in the sand. If your evidence doesn’t cross that line? It goes into the giant carnival bin. It lays next to Pixie and Gnome “evidence”. Someone brought up the point that Sasquatch numbers are not healthy enough to harvest a specimen. If they are truly going extinct? One specimen is not going to matter. Better to document what’s left of the unknown species than to let it slip off quietly into the night. Are there other methods than shooting one? Yes. Dr. Disotell in the million dollar Bigfoot bounty showed researchers how to collect evidence. Everything from hair to scat to collecting mosquitos for their blood in their stomachs. Archeological digs could unearth bones. Even walking around in the forest may produce bones to collect. EDNA may hold promise in the future by simply sampling waterways for a complete map of the local fauna. But running samples does cost $$$$. But so does gas, food, dental resin and hi tech video and audio equipment. And none of those produce physical evidence. If your a squatcher that just likes to go out and have “experiences” in the woods. Hey! It’s a free country, right? But if your invested in science? Research LEADS to a discovery! A discovery that must be confirmed by a panel of your peers. Self reflection isn’t an easy task. And it’s easy to loose sight of the goal. Here is my list of things we as a community can improve on. 1) Physical Evidence #1 priority A) Actively hunting the creature B) Collecting trace evidence for DNA samples (Hair, Scat, Blood, etc) C) Noting footprints or tree breaks or screams in the night are fine and dandy. So long as they don’t become the focus of the pursuit. Elk hunters don’t record Bull Elk bugles and call it a day. You follow the sign to the animal itself. You don’t document sign and go home. 2) Share knowledge!!! A) Science requires peer review. Hiding locations of activity? So your the sole “experience” storyteller makes you look like a quack. If your a biologist discovering a new species? Your gonna try to come out with a type specimen. Short of that your going to document the area so that follow on researchers can easily find what you observed. Maybe they will finish what you started. Which IS science. Humans building knowledge in a collective effort. B) Its not about you, your organization or your TV show. It’s about an unknown species. It’s about conservation. 3) Be prepared! A) A 800 lbs omnivore primate is not your friend. Study early hominids and cannibalism. Cannibalism still exists in our own species. Look at Indian legends. Just because your not actively hunting it doesn’t give you a free pass. You could be attacked for the same reasons as a Bear. Territorial dispute, offspring, mating, startled, etc. Or maybe it just hates humans. B) Your knowledge should range from correct bullet calibers to map and compass reading to tracking to survival and first aid. Knowledge is power. But power needs to be applied. So practice, practice, practice. 4) Strength in numbers A) It’s rare and elusive. The best way to combat that is by increasing our numbers in the woods and be ready to collect physical evidence. It’s number 1 strength is that it can hide from us. But it cannot hide all traces of itself. Spread out until the net makes contact and then close in. B) Dont avoid the steep and deep. Because it will not. Think about where humans don’t tread in wilderness. Swamp bogs, mountain peaks, steep canyons, brush, deadfall, etc. Please feel free to add onto the list. Its my observation that the pro kill mindset is more prevalent than it was 10 years ago. Why? Probably because the conventional wisdom of the Finding Bigfoot crowd has failed. The secrecy, the whooping, tree banging, foot casts, the blurry videos. With that said they are a well organized group with a wealth of sightings reports. We don’t need to reinvent the wheel. We just need to get it rolling down the road. I understand. But it gets tiresome repeating oneself over and over and over again.
    6 points
  34. I have listened to both of the "Sierra Sounds " cds many times. And we're talking probably 100 times each. What's fascinating to me is, at least in my opinion, those sounds would be impossible to fake. First and foremost, the vocalizations run the gamut of speech patterns and inflections. In the various recordings, the vocalizations contain phonemes, laughter, elements of exasperation, and the fact that there are at least 4 different sources of the vocalizations as well. You can clearly discern a very large, deep voice. A very feminine high pitched voice, and occasionally a very small voice. There is a part in the recordings where one of the hunters is mimicking one of the squatches. The squatch would whistle, or make some kind of vocalization, and the hunter would try to mimic it. At one point, clear as a bell, you can hear the squatch laughing at the hunter. The sounds were studied in the late 70's. The results were: there were at least 4 different subjects making the vocalizations. According to their findings, the deepest voice had a vocal tract of someone/something that was extraordinarily tall. I want to say they put the subject at around 8 ft. Also, they determined the whistles were made with the vocal chords, and not the pursing of lips (as humans do). The hunters believed the group consisted of "The Old Man", the deepest voice and probably the father. A female, the high pitched, feminine voice, and 2 younger ones. The first set of recordings were made in 1972. Those recordings were much more hostile sounding, and very rapid fire chimp like articulations. The second set of recording were made 2 years later in 1974, and the vocalizations were much slower, and had the sound of some sort of language. Also, the squatch in the first set of recordings was the "Old Man" in the second set of recordings. They believe the "Old Man" came back, with his family, and deliberately slowed down their vocalizations in an attempt to communicate in 1974. Look for interviews with R. Scott Nelson on this subject. In the late 2000's, his son was doing a book report on Bigfoot for school. They did a web search and came across snippets of the Sierra Sounds. Mr. Nelson is a retired Naval crypto linguist. He was trained to find coded messages in any kind of audio correspondence. Language played backwards, foreign languages played backwards, etc. He immediately identified the vocalizations as "Language as we define it". He obtained the original recordings from Ron Morehead, and had the necessary equipment to eliminate all the background noise, clean up the audio, etc. etc. Mr. Nelson said of the recordings, that again there were at least 4 different subjects, and in many instances they are talking over each other. They most definitely are speaking some kind of language as we define it. There were repeated phrases, and that they might even have names for one another. He's actually studied other recordings from various parts of the U.S., and found similarities in them. In one interview i heard, Mr. Nelson sent the recordings to a colleague in Japan that specialized in ancient Japanese dialects. His colleague contacted him and thought it was a very elaborate joke. When Mr. Nelson asked why, colleague responded with '" There are small bits of a Japanese dialect that no one has used in centuries in these recordings." Maybe the Samurai Chatter, as we call it, is just that. If you have not heard these, they are very much worth listening to. There's actually lots of other interesting things about the vocalizations, but this kind of touches on the high points.
    6 points
  35. No, the tech simply isn't there now and may not be possible ever. The problem (I'm a programmer, computer science grad, IT guy ... so this stuff is in my area of expertise) is that a chip is not enough. A chip is a processor. To DO anything you have to also have a power supply and I/O devices for the processor. We don't have the capability to build power supplies of sufficient strength, sufficient life, that is small enough. Moreover, the smaller the I/O device is, the more power it takes to send the same signal over distance. In other words, we have conflicting limitations. The RFIDs we are most familiar with are passive, they can only be used at short range in the immediate presence of a scanner. A scanner capable of "reaching" a small device at great distance has to use a great deal of power ... cells / DNA subjected to that level of power break down (aka "cancer" ... same root mechanism as skin cancer from excessive UV radiation). We're not merely not there, but we can't get there, not with mere improvements in the current technology, it would require something entirely new, something that lies well into the realm of science fiction today. MIB
    6 points
  36. I'm thinking the Bumble(aka the Abominable snowman, kinda telling, eh?) from Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer is the first introduction a good many of us had to the world of giant furry hominids, one that laid a foundation of wonder at a seemingly terrifying being who later plays the role of the only one capable of a critical task. Also, am I the only one who thinks of Norseman whenever Yukon Cornelius comes on screen? In a good way of course! Merry Christimas and happy holidays to you all!
    6 points
  37. I managed to get a nice long day in the mountains, with fellow BFFer MagniAesir and another sasquatch seeker, Robert J. It was a beautiful sunny fall day, cool in the morning, but warm enough to sit in shirtsleeves at lunch time, overlooking a deep wooded valley while we ate, glassed the area, and chatted for a couple of hours. Though we were about 40km off pavement, the great weather brought out lots of 4x4s, quads, and bikes, so chances of spotting any sasquatch or game near the logging roads was very slim. Our ace up the sleeve for that situation was the drone that Robert brought along, and piloted like a pro. He got in a long flight across the valley to a peak on the far side, and another later in the afternoon, along the large creek that feeds the lake in the S end of the valley. We couldn't spot any creatures on the small cell phone screen while it was in flight, but we will study the high res images after he gets them uploaded, and yes, I will post a link to them here when that's done, he's already OKed that. We stayed in the valley till dusk (much too early now that DST is over), then headed back out to pavement, over an hour away on the less than smooth logging roads. For now, all I can offer are my usual phone cam shots of the valley. The peaks at the N end of the valley The lake below to the South A late season butterfly came for a visit at lunch time Down at the beach near dusk. Yes, the fish were rising, and we had no fishing gear :-( Zoom in on the water between the trucks, and you'll see the rings from the rises! The large creek feeding the lake.
    6 points
  38. I came across a beaver dam in a very small pond created by these engineering wonders. There is a creek which flows into it and one that flows out of it. I put a trailcam on both ends and should capture anything that enters the creek area. We'll see.
    6 points
  39. I think I found my ugly Christmas sweater! https://www.gearliberty.com/products/bigfoot-ugly-sweatshirt-for-bigfoot-lovers-on-christmas-time-0095-t5vth0078?fbclid=IwAR20mXn17tK6uORM81CTuMFkQBfdyh50VUUs4Hu5pJ-QnocHpHviQ9Q78do
    6 points
  40. Went to see my Surgeon to drain more fluid yesterday, and she says things are healing well. Had a meeting with my Oncologist this morning. She said, long story short, that my risk assessments came out the lowest that they've seen, and that means NO CHEMOTHERAPY and NO RADIATION! They think they got all the cancer. I'll still have to do the hormone therapy, and I meet with that doc in a week. I can return to limited work next week, too. Which is good because i am out of vacation and sick leave! More good news!
    6 points
  41. I am fascinated by how this vast continent (two continents, actually) came to be populated. It's a field that's wide open, with new discoveries occasionally showing earlier and earlier habitation. It's a contentious field, and it seems the "Clovis First" axiom has generally been found to be inaccurate. Current evidence suggests the first Americans were here perhaps 20,000 years ago (BP). It must have been an amazing time. It's a valid thread topic, as we can speculate whether bigfoot was present for far longer, or if they, too, immigrated into the Americas in the more recent past, say 50K years. Here's a presentation that I enjoyed and found enlightening. It describes several different technologies evident from their stone and bone tool fabrication. Hopefully you'll not be bored to tears with this.
    5 points
  42. 5 points
  43. If we are up against the forces you seem to imagine, and they have decided discovery isn't going to happen, then discovery isn't going to happen. You have to hope they're not quite that organized and detailed otherwise the game is already over before it starts. Realize something: this is a public forum. Every single thing you put on here is available to everyone to read. EVERYONE. Including those hypothetical people out there who are trying to thwart your efforts. By putting your plans, or asking others to put their plans, on here on the forum you're setting people up to fail because when those plans hit the public internet .. like here .. it gives "them" time to anticipate your moves, prepare for them, and defeat you without you ever knowing there was a fight. If you truly believe all this stuff, and you still want to prove existence, the first thing you have to do is keep your big mouth shut rather than tip your hand giving "the enemy" all of the advantage and you none. This is why I wonder sometimes if you're not part of the conspiracy to keep bigfoot secret 'cause you keep nudging people in ways that lead them to spill their plans. That means you're part of the mechanism that lets "them" stay a couple moves ahead of the researchers .. intentional or otherwise. Think about it. It's a chess game. You don't win by giving your opponent your strategy before the game starts. MIB
    5 points
  44. Saturday, June 25, 2021. Went exploring but found nothing bigfoot related. It was, however, fun! And the lake was absolutely gorgeous.
    5 points
  45. In my opinion, not being together yields the best results. We are all think tanks. We approach things differently and we view how we get to the end result differently. Do we want one think tank or one thousand think tanks? One mouse trap or the never-ending search for a better mouse trap. In my opinion, the best result is achieved by a thousand think tanks working separately but sharing their methods and results.
    5 points
  46. I made my own, with built in low pass filters. This helps me record what I want, and filter out annoying bug noises. They need power though, so they run on a 9V battery, that also lasts a week. It's all explained in that audio sharing thread.
    5 points
  47. I've been out in the woods all of my life because I enjoy hiking and backpacking. I've always felt at home there and underwent wilderness survival training and navigation long before Dual Survival, or any other survival series, was on TV popularizing the subject matter. My interest in sasquatching happened in 2004 and has captured my attention since. Sasquatching involves a lot of tedious work and spending oodles of hours in the field. It can be very discouraging as the success rate of finding any evidence, much less having a sighting, is very small. Those who go to the woods solely to find sasquatch are much less likely to stick with the program if that is their only reason to be there. Conversely, you are far more likely to stay with the program if you love being in the outdoors to begin with. It is akin to going out fishing and coming up dry. Was the day a disaster or did you have a blast? I went out for an overnight Thursday. There was a light amount of snow on the ground which made it perfect to look for prints. We didn't see any. At night around a fire, both of us heard a snort or blow which was probably a deer. It's easy to head home cold, maybe wet, and nothing to show for you efforts. Napoleon trudging home from Moscow. I had a great time, look forward to the next time out, and will examine what else I can do differently the next time.
    5 points
  48. We went out today to scout an area that we found described in an old rock climbing blog that has been dormant since 2013. The gentleman who made the blog named one of the areas that he mapped "Sasquatch Boulders" and included a few first and second hand accounts of Bigfoot sightings in that immediate area that spawned that name. While the area itself is interesting and may be worth investigating further, the really neat part of today was a side trip that we made to a local collection of petroglyphs found in this region. While Native American rock art was just as widespread here as in the American southwest, it doesn't last as long here due to the weather. So, when intact pieces are found it's very exciting. This is a piece that they have labeled as the representation of some sort of birdman entity. The gentleman who discovered and catalogued it thought that the scratches deliberately marked across the figure's body signified feathers. Like many other tribes, the Cherokee and Catawba have legends of Thunderbird, Eagle, and Raven. Raven is a shape shifter, which might have been the inspiration for this petroglyph. However, there isn't a birdman that I know of in local Indian folklore. I am going through my copy of James Mooney's Myths of the Cherokee to see if anything jumps out at me. When I look at this, I don't see feathers, I see long strands of hair. Tsul Kalu is the name that the Cherokee gave to the hairy giants that they claimed lived in these mountains. I think that this is more likely to be a representation of one of these 'slanted eyed giants' than a birdman.
    5 points
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