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  1. Boys and Girls, here's first dibs on the soon to be released 'lite' version of the Nest Area analysis that i finished for 2021. This report prior to today, has only been viewed internally by Olympic Project members and a very selective few others. As mentioned, it's the 'lite' version that i just wanted to release due to time restrictions and going forward, i need to analyze both weather conditions and moon phase correlations among other things, when time is a little easier to come by for me. Anyway, it's important to me that BFF members get a first look at it and i hope this thread can ignite productive conversation among us. It's important to note that all Bird and Mammal recordings analyzed were clarified by multiple people using the MaCaulay Library of Sound. As and when i make edits due to people pointing out grammatical errors etc, i'll update the report and post the most recent edit here as we go along. The recording project is continuing and recording as i write and i can tell you that 2022 and the first Winter that has been recorded so far, has been extremely productive and Winter was the season that was most interesting to us due to the timing of both the original Nests found (February) and the 2020 new 'under construction' Nest find (February). If anybody has any questions at all on anything, please add to the thread and i'll try my best to answer them, checking in to the thread on a minimum of every Monday and Tuesday at least. I'd be really interested on peoples thoughts and/or experiences of the possible Coyote Warning/Locator call correlations that were found. Sharing is caring, enjoy ! Edit : If anyone wants this on PDF, just message me your email address and i'll send it across soonest.
    12 points
  2. I for sure would include Florida. I have posted this before, but I had three experiences while I lived in Florida. We lived for a couple of years in Sarasota, maybe ten miles or so from Myakka River State Park, where the "Myakka Skunk Ape" photos were allegedly taken. Here's a copy: _____ Though I live in Oregon, all three of my "experiences" happened in Florida, less than ten miles from Myakka River State Park about fifteen years ago. I was living at a country club / older folks' community called Heritage Oaks while I was in Florida going to school for a couple of years. Whenever I could, I would get out into nature by hiking up at Myakka River State Park and surrounding areas. Beautiful place, but it can be dangerous. There’s a lot of wildlife and it seems everything out there is looking to hurt or kill you. Lots of gators, poisonous snakes, spiders, boars, panthers, and my wife and I even saw two jaguarundis once at Myakka River State Park. My experiences though, happened at the golf course, strangely enough. The first experience we had, I was with my wife and we were out sitting on our screened in porch on the second floor enjoying a cigar and a cold fermented malt beverage. It was very late at night, I would say maybe 2AM, and we had the lights out so I wouldn’t get busted for smoking a cigar. Just talking and relaxing. This second-floor porch overlooked maybe 20 feet of grass, then a retaining pond (lake), and the golf course itself. We could see none of it though, it was a very dark night. Well this night was very quiet. Suddenly, we heard bipedal footsteps sloshing through the water. Big. Deliberate. Not fast, but not slow. It was covering a lot of ground with those steps. Now it was too dark to see, but I knew at the time there are only two things in the water at night in Florida. Gators, and gator food. If you are not one, you are the other. But even though you could hear the sloshing of the steps, you could almost feel the ground thumping as whatever it was moved. It wouldn’t make sense that a person would be walking through the water at night after midnight with no flashlight (or even with one for that matter). But this was no gator. Whatever it was was walking on two legs. As it passed the “lanai”, we were both afraid to even look to see what it was. Not that we could have anyway. But we didn’t even want to get close to the screen. It passed right by us. I would say no more than 30 feet away, max. It never broke stride. We were both too afraid to even speak. And when we did, we whispered and didn’t pronounce our “s’s” because we didn’t want to be heard by whatever it was. We sat there a long while after this thing was gone, trying to figure out what it was. I joked “skunk ape” with her, but the truth was that I was pretty certain that’s what we heard. I have seen deer out there and tons of birds. But this was no deer. No wild pig. Not a bear. Not a panther. It was bigger than those for certain. I still don’t KNOW what it was But if I had to put money down on something, I would have to go with a skunk ape because nothing else fits. That was the first experience. The second and third ones are tied together. Let me set the stage a little. I had an old dog. He was awesome. Always quiet and mild mannered. Unless there was danger. Then he became 120 pounds of growling snarling canine badassery. Mix of black lab, German shepherd, chow, akita, and coyote. I had to walk him when I got home from school. Usually that was after midnight or so. Outside the gate of the community though, there was swamp land, and general native Florida wilderness. When I say “gate”, I mean there was a drop-down arm to block vehicles, but people could just walk around it. Boy, I miss the sounds of the gators and frogs at night! I would take Tucker out there to do his business next to the road. I always carried my pistol because it was scary out there with just a flashlight. This particular night, I was walking Tucker towards the gate to get out to the road to his happy pooping grounds, when he started walking slower. His head was lowered, and he was growling softly. Now we were still in the golf course community, mind you. But right next to a small pond that was completely blocked off with trees. You couldn’t even see this pond. Not even the landscapers went in there. I know, because I was curious and went in there one day. Very thick native Florida bush. Then swampy pond. Almost perfectly circular. Maybe fifty feet across is all. It’s own little nature preserve in miniature. It was right next to a man-made retaining pond that had gators and fish and frogs and snakes and the like in it. As we were passing this pond which you cannot see, Tucker’s hackles went up and he started growling loud, and baring his teeth. His eyes were fixed on the small trees next to us. These trees were maybe 20 to 25 feet tall. Almost like tall bushes, really. Just as I was really realizing that something was in there, that something growled from the cover of those trees. Loud as hell. I could feel it in my chest, even. I could feel my hair stand up. That had never happened to me before, and it was a really strange sensation. That growl was so low in pitch and loud! It was not a gator, as I have heard those sounds before many times. Then the trees began shaking VIOLENTLY. I thought whatever it was was either going to rip them down or come charging out, so I had my 1911 drawn. We backed away from those trees without turning around. I did not want to turn my back to them. My heart was pounding. I was scared crapless. We finally came home from a different route (we actually walked all the way around the community because I didn’t want to pass those bushes again. My wife asked where I had been and I explained everything. She thought it was funny. Well I was not amused. A few weeks went by, and my mother in law came to visit from Texas. We had an extra room, so it was no big deal. She always loved to go outside and see the nature there. She loved to walk the dog, too. I told her to stay away from the “growly bushes” as they had become to be known as. She teased me and I tried to explain I was NOT kidding and I was deadly serious. It piqued her curiousity. Well late one night maybe here or four weeks after the first “growly-bush” experience, we had been tipping a few drinks out on the lanai. It was late, and the dog needed to go out one last time. She volunteered, and asked me to go with her because she wanted to see the “growly-bushes”. I decided to show her where it happened. So foolishly, we headed down there. Tucker again started growling slow and low, with his head down as we approached the bushes. My mother in law started getting freaked out. Then as we got near them, the thing growled loud at us and shook the trees again, exactly as it had done before. My mother in law was terrified, and so was I. When we got back up to the safety of the condo, she swore that she would never doubt me again. Neither of us know for certain what growled at us. But whatever it was, had to be huge to shake the trees like that. I tried shaking them in the day time some time later, and could get them to move, but nothing like what we experienced. The good thing is that I had a witness this time. And she was able to relay what happened to my wife. Now my wife knows I was not joking about it. There are strange things out there. And now that I am in Oregon and my kids are grown, I want to find out. That’s why I go out to the woods when I can and search for these beings. I know they are out there. And I hope to be able to find enough proof to satisfy my own curiosity, which I think will never be satisfied. _____
    10 points
  3. Last weekend, I decided to mix 3 of my favourite activities together, camping, bigfooting, and astronomy. My wife and I headed up a relatively popular FSR (Forest Service Road) that is gated (only members of the local 4WD club have the code). We were hoping to get back to a camping spot we were at 3 years ago, but fell many kilometres short. I put out a recorder (Zoom H4n), but the only sounds we had were a bear that decided to snoop around after I had gone to bed at 2 AM. The weekend wasn't a total loss. I did manage to get some nice photos ...
    8 points
  4. zeebob889 is really vinchyfoot, I hate trolls.
    8 points
  5. Maiden voyage! (Just on property in Newport) It rides nicer than the K5…
    8 points
  6. BFF 2022 Researcher of the Year Contest Dear BFF members, The Forum Management Team and the Steering Committee are proud to announce the 2022 Researcher of the Year contest. It is made possible by your donations. Thank You! Contest Purpose We want to encourage BFF members to gather evidence of the existence of Bigfoot and support your efforts. Prize $2500 (It may increase after next year's fund drive) Rules The person or group who submits the best evidence for the existence of Bigfoot will win the prize. The person submitting the evidence must be a member of the BFF or join the BFF in order to participate. The evidence presented must have been obtained by the person or group submitting it. The evidence must be posted in this thread. If the evidence is in a form which cannot be submitted electronically, reasonable arrangements may be made to review the evidence, solely at our discretion. The winner must have a PayPal account in order to receive the prize. All evidence must be submitted by December 23th, 2022. The Steering Committee plus two judges selected by the Forum Management Team will choose three finalists from all the submissions on December 25th, 2022. BFF members in good standing with 50 or more posts will vote to select a winner from the three finalists from December 26th to December 31rst, 2022. The winner will be announced on January 1rst, 2023 and the prize disbursed. The BFF Director will be the final arbiter of any disputes, misunderstandings, errors, disqualifications, etc. Good Luck! ~gigantor
    7 points
  7. Attached herewith please find the Paul Freeman filmsite. He shot video of one subject but on camera he wonders if there are two Bigfoot. I visited the filmsite in July 2022, just shy of the 30th anniversary of the video. The most astonishing thing to me is that after almost three decades of time the place was easily recognizable. Not so with the P-G filmsite. The video was taken in the morning on August 20, 1992, often incorrectly noted as 1994. Photos courtesy and copyright © Daniel Perez, 2022. A full write up on the matter in the current edition of my newsletter. The photo of the road sign is where you turn to go down to Deduct Spring, Oregon, often called Deduct Springs and sometimes written as Deduck Spring. Daniel Perez www.bigfoottimes.net
    7 points
  8. Greetings, everyone! First-time poster here, but somewhat long-time lurker. I live in the Washington, DC area but recently had some personal business take me to NW Ohio. I chose a stopover point near Salt Fork State Park, both because it made sense travel-wise and because it gave the opportunity to do some hiking in an area where there'd been Bigfoot activity both in the past and present. I of course hiked around the "Bigfoot Ridge" area. Actually, a really nice park employee pointed me to an unmarked trail (meaning, not on the official trail map) that was nonetheless blazed with red markings and which paralleled below the Bigfoot Ridge area. It's located right behind the picnic area of the Stone House that's one of the sights to see within the park. The same employee also showed me a pic of a tree structure she'd seen herself, and recounted how she sometimes heard whoops and whatnot in the evenings. Anyway, it was a pretty cool trail that was somewhat overgrown and had some deadfall on it, but nothing too bad (it's no longer maintained, apparenty). I can neither confirm nor deny whether I went off-trail to investigate some squatchy-looking hollers. While I didn't observe anything on that trail, earlier I had hiked the Morgan's Knob trail, where I saw an interesting track in the mud (first pic below). A few things to note: 1) there was a squall that had some through in the morning the day before, so it was quite muddy, and I wonder if it could've affected the shape of an otherwise innocuous print or have been an artifact of the water flow itself; 2) the print was on the actual trail, on an incline; and 3) for size reference, the water bottle is 8", sorry it's at a slight angle, as I said, it was on an incline and was kinda hard to place something that'd stay still. I think you can see some good detail of what looks like the heel area and some toe impressions as well. This was from the first of my two trips to the park, in mid-May. I'm interested in others' thoughts on it. I didn't see an discernible prints near it...some indentations, sure, but nothing with detail. To me, while it looked like a pretty good track, I did find it odd that it was basically in the trail itself, where a rivulet had probably flowed the say prior during the torrential rain. The following four pics are from my second trip in mid-June. For this trip, I drove on some of the gravel park roads, and there were pull-offs on these that led to "unmarked" trails. On one of these, after hiking through the woods for a bit, I came to a large meadow with tall grass. I hiked across it to the next wooded area, and shortly after entering, noticed a curious looking tree structure. I took two pics, one close-up, and one further back to give a better sense of the surroundings (pics two and three, respectively). Interestingly, near the possible tree structure (was it perhaps a marker?), I noticed what I thought was really a good, natural "hunting blind" that looked out over the meadow (pic four). Right behind the "blind," there was also a well-flattened area where it looked like something had lain, but perhaps not very recently, as there was a small fallen branch in the middle of the "bedding" area (pic five). I called it a "hunting blind," but it really could be used by prey too, I guess. Anyway, I'm curious to know everyone's thoughts on these too. Look forward to the feedback!
    7 points
  9. Went for a nice little day trip with my wife on Sunday, to an FSR near Squamish. Stopped to check out a recreation site about 20 km in and stopped back later in the day for a bbq. Took a spur road, which ended up being a newly active logging area. The ground was still nice and soft, perfect for tracks, so we stopped and had a scout around. Found a few bear tracks and "human shaped" footprints, but, unfortunately, they were boot-tracks. Didn't take any pictures of those. Who wants to see photos of some logger's old, worn-out Kodiaks anyway. Absolutely no wildlife seen, whatsoever, except for a single solitary Grouse, and a deer, about 600 m (just shy of 2000 ft) from the FSR entrance off the highway. The area looks promising, so we are going to go back for a campout in the future.
    7 points
  10. My whole BFF family! Some of you I have met, many of you I have not. I still say a BFF gathering would be super cool!
    7 points
  11. I decided to explore La Ventana Wilderness in Monterey County California in early April. There are only 4 BRFO reports (in the SSR database) for Monterey County in California but I have heard of other non-public reports. I have never visited this wilderness area before. Attached below is a Google Earth image snip with the 4 BFRO Reports plotted (3 orange dots and 1 yellow dot) to put in the context the route I took. I went backpacking into the Ventana Wilderness via the route shown in the attached map. It was a 3 nights and 4 days backpack. The first night was spent at Vicente Flat campground which was next to a creek. The campground had lots of people ~15. The second night was spent at Goat Camp (a beautiful location with creeks north and south and view of the ocean). Only saw 3 other people there. On the 3rd day, we took a long day hike to Cone Peak and back, and spent the last night at Limekiln creek. This is not a campground, but we crashed on a wash on the creek (see photo). We saw no large wildlife (deer, coyote, etc.). Did not even see squirrels! Saw snakes, bluebirds, and numerous other birds. I used my audio recorder the first 2 nights, and there were plenty of barred owls and other type of owls. No unusual sounds were detected. On the 3rd night by the creek, the creek sound was too loud to record anything so I did not record. I took my big thermal imager and tripod all the way up to Goat Camp and back and did not use it. I did not use it because my strategy was to keep it in my tent off until I heard some anomalous sound. Then I will turn it on, scan the area and mount it on tripod. Neither I nor my buddy (who does not believe in BF nor cares about looking for it) heard any weird sounds during all 3 nights. I did this trip because I wanted to explore deep into the Ventana wilderness and see the different ecosystems. We saw diverse types of vegetation (chaparral, cypress, live oaks, redwoods, sugar pines) and also grass and lupine meadows. There was plenty of water in those creeks up there. I saw no sign of BF in all in the areas we visited. I don't know if BF is still present in the coastal areas south of Monterey. This wilderness area gets lots of visitors in the spring (after rainy season and before the hot summer). The whole trail had poison oak all along the way. We took Tecnu and washed every time we thought we touched the plants. While I did not get any rash while I was there, I did get hit with a poison oak rash on my left arm after I got home. Whole left arm is full of blisters and swollen. Probably won't hike again in coastal areas with poison oak anymore since I am extremely allergic.
    7 points
  12. This. There are tons of people talk about it. Post about it on Facebook. Hang out at the local KOA and walk the perimeter of the campground at night banging on trees. Not that there is anything wrong with any of that… people should be able to enjoy the subject and involve themselves however they like. But, what I think would be considered ‘research’? Not many people are involved with that. There’s a reason why more people gravitate to ghost hunting than Bigfoot research. Because Bigfoot research is often difficult, dirty, time consuming often without much payoff, expensive, and often carries a bit of a social stigma. Not to mention the personality types that seem to be attracted to this sort of thing. Petty infighting and jealousy. Scarcity mentality. Lack of self awareness. All of those tend to keep the people from getting too involved as well. This is one of the most truthful comments ever made on this forum. Let’s be honest… witness reports, accounts, and evidence are often cherry-picked to conform with a person’s personal biases. A lot of people cry out for a purely scientific approach to the phenomenon, while basically twisting accepted science into knots trying to explain that which seems to elude explanation. Warm blooded animals seeing in infrared. Infrasound trotted out as a catch all explanation despite its established limitations. Mammals displaying bioluminescence in sensory organs that depend upon light themselves. Physical speed and stealth far in excess of any other primate. “These things are just undiscovered apes… apes that display physical abilities far in excess than any other animal found on earth”. Established science gets tied into knots… and then the knot tiers complain about why established scientists don’t take the subject seriously. A lot of people are not comfortable saying “I don’t know.” They need to build a narrative to explain things. I don’t know what these things are On the contrary… I think that you will find those independent weekend warriors to be more adaptable and willing to try new things than any established organization. Those independents are not so constrained by groupthink or required methodology. Those groups have their structure, beliefs, and methods… in order to be part of the group you will need to conform with those constraints. We see it all the time… people who are quick to attack others for having a different approach, all the while talking about their “20 years of experience”. No, man. You have one year’s experience repeated 20 times.
    7 points
  13. Fair enough. I have a different take-away though. My analogy is icebergs. 10% above the surface, 90% below .. give or take. I don't think it is our research practices or methods that are flawed, I think it is the assumptions that guide them .. a deeper, more fundamental flaw. We're not inept. I believe that if our assumptions were right, then our methods would have produced results. I don't know what the answer is but I am convinced that whatever it is, we're going to find that bigfoots aren't what we think they are. I think we need to step back and review the apparent crackpot theories. Apply some science to them looking for ways they could succeed, not just for ways to dismiss them. I think that because we are uncomfortable with aspects of them, we attempt to force failure so we don't have to face discomfort rather than looking into them to see how they might work thus suss out the answer to our mystery. You might even say we use "pure science" as a means to hide intellectual cowardice. MIB
    7 points
  14. https://bigfoottimes.net/books/the-10-best-bigfoot-books.php Just ten! Enjoy. Daniel Perez
    7 points
  15. What I took away from the Two Reasons without adding in any of the religious elements, is that 1) Killing you during an encounter is always on the menu. Maybe choice number 10 or option 45, but always there. Therefore, be careful. They are strong and wild and you do not know them. Treat them with the respect and caution you would any wild animal (or potentially crazy human). And 2) They don't communicate, so we can't reason with them and we have no way of knowing what they're thinking. Anything else is some form of anthropomorphism. There is danger in making incorrect assumptions based on OUR beliefs that may or may not be true. I'm not interested in any of the religious interpretations one way or another, nor any woo. Carpenters' belief system influences how he views the creatures. We ALL have some sort of belief system about who we are in the grand scheme of things and who THEY are. But distilling the two reasons into the above made sense to me. YMMV.
    7 points
  16. Im just going to start dumping my trail cam pics into this thread! Enjoy! (No elk this time…. Dang it!)
    6 points
  17. 2022. Arrived a month ago yesterday. Got the plates on Friday. It's on its second tank of gas. There are upgrades in its future but first by bank account needs a breather 'cause along with this, I got Starlink and a new Sage fly rod. Time to put the brakes on for a month or two. In the mean time, I headed for the woods yesterday. Mostly fishin' but also keeping my eye open for tracks and running an audio recorder. It's about a month past the "hot time" for the area so it was no surprise that I heard / saw / smelled nothing at all. River crossing is via the white log. Sketchy but .. sketchy. The burn scar from a fire in 2008. Up on top above the ridgeline the burn continues. It is just over a mile to the top. I've spent a lot of time down in the shadow along the trail looking up into the timber with big glass .. spotting scope, 'nocs, and camera, but I haven't seen anything interesting in there yet. Nor have I heard anything. This is probably my favorite view. As a fishermen those pools look **good**. Can't get to them from the trail side though, there's a 15-30 foot drop-off into the water all along on my side. No way to get back out. The views are great. It's not that pleasant, though. By the time the river drops enough to fish the mosquitoes get real bad and by the time the mosquitoes back off the yellowjackets, then hornets, get going. There's always some kind of irritation. It's a nice place to hike in winter if you can get to the trailhead (snow). Also not a real safe place to camp because of the trees from that fire 14 years ago that are still falling. MIB
    6 points
  18. I'm sorry if this is news to anybody, but everything they ever said or did in Expedition BS season one was a lie or fake. We were debunking their claims in real time on this forum by season's end. I've had no reason to watch any more of it, but why expect anything different? They cannot be taken seriously. Sadly, I have friends who still think this show is useful. Thinker Thunker did a good job of exposing the hoax here.
    6 points
  19. It is my understanding that he did not HOAX prints. He MADE prints to see what difficulties a hoaxer would encounter, what the telltale signs of a hoax would be. That's a big, big difference. I am not aware of him trying to pass off any fake tracks as real .. ever. That is simply .. spin .. originated, as I understand it, by border patrol tracker who was brought in to debunk Paul's track find ... not investigate, mind you, but **debunk**. In other words, a paid character assassin.
    6 points
  20. In 1994 or 95, I was still living in Minnesota. The eastern portion of the state is thickly forested, and where I grew up was no exception. The underbrush can be very difficult to get through, let alone see into. The summer leaves make for ideal cover. I went bear hunting with a friend of mine that late summer/ early fall. Bear baiting is legal and an accepted practice there, at least it was. You could go to most grocery stores and bakeries and get a pickup load of food for free. You had to check back almost everyday, most hunters would be looking also. Sweets made for the best bait pile. We would just throw it on the ground at likely places. Some scouting beforehand would be ideal, of course. We had one bait pile hit out of three, I believe. A bear will absolutely destroy the bait. It looks like a small tornado has gone through, lol. My friend was going to sit in his tree stand above the bait pile, and we decided to set out “honey burners” to attempt to attract the bear. To make a honey burner, we took two coffe cans. A 5lb and a 1lb sounds right, but I don’t drink coffee, so my memory may be fuzzy. (It’s actually quite fuzzy from time to time.) we drilled 4 holes in the 5lb can to put a couple metal rods through to hold the 1lb can up from the bottom of the other can far enough to put a can of lit sterno under it. We then poured honey into the 1lb and wired the contraption to a tree. We each had a burner set up and we were about 200 yards apart. The smell of the honey was thick, as there was only a slight breeze. I only had a burner going. No bait pile. We could not see each other at all. I sat in my portable tree stand for a few hours, and along about dusk, something in the brush behind the burner started to growl at me. Deep, guttural grows. The growls were loud. I thought there was a bear back there, naturally, I was bear hunting, what else could it be? Lol. Those growls were quickly turning into a underwear changing moment for me. Then a tree in the background started to shake. Like, whip back and forth like nothing I had ever saw before. The top of the quaking aspen, (pople in Minnesotan) was somewhere around 15 feet off the ground, and the very top was shaking so fast. I don’t even know how to describe it. The growls intensified dramatically. I switched the safety of my .270 off. Then it just quit. The silence was deafening. The 200 yard walk to my friend was long, I tell ya. When I got there, we walked out together. It was almost completely dark by then. I never returned to that spot after I retrieved my stand the next day. I never considered this a Sasquatch encounter. I hadn’t even heard of tree shakes being a thing until about 8 years ago. When I heard about Sasquatch shaking trees, I instantly remembered this experience. At that time, I thought the PNW was the only place Bigfoot lived. Had I known then, I could’ve looked for tracks. I could’ve looked for bear tracks too, but those growls made me not want to know. So, I have no clue if this was an encounter or not. And I’m still just as happy to not know.
    6 points
  21. The last couple of days I have been watching any videos I can find on Dr. John Bindernagel, will be ordering his book! He sadly passed a few years ago, but in my opinion, everything he’s researched and published is still so relevant, AND he even said before he passed, that he no longer is 100% on the giganto side of things, and that he’s very open to it being a primate of some kind, whether closer to ape or human. This interview is the first of two parts and shortly before he died, an excellent interview! this second link is for the first of three videos that Dr. Bindernagel filmed for anyone wanting to learn❤️ https://youtu.be/plGaIC9pJ6E
    6 points
  22. Not as spiffy as NorthWind's fancy new truck, but I've got new wheels (again lol). I'm the happy owner of a new-to-me Ford Escape. Looking forward to fixing her up a bit. We took her on our adventuring yesterday and she did well. She's big enough to camp in, just in time for our upcoming night squatching adventure in 2 weeks (stay tuned!). Welcome "Indigo", or "Indy-go!"
    6 points
  23. I like how the camera points straight ahead until they get to the creature…🙄
    6 points
  24. Most everyone I have ever spoken directly with who has had a bigfoot sighting / encounter has never officially reported it. That would greatly change the data.
    6 points
  25. I don't believe I'd shoot a sasquatch, but I might shoot that.
    6 points
  26. Your questions are answered in Chapter 16 of my book, which I attach here for use of Forum Members ONLY. Please do not forward to anybody else. In summary, no genome of 20,000 human mtDNA sequences had two or three of these mutations. Very few had even one. Percentages of each primate group which have these mutations are found in Figure 27 of Chapter 16. These range from less than 1% for humans to 100% in some groups. Chapter 16 FINAL.docx
    6 points
  27. I managed to get out again this afternoon, with more success than last week's attempt. This time I was able to actually reach my target locations, a small high mountain lake that I had never seen before, and a bay on Harrison Lake that was unreachable 2 weeks ago due to deep wet snow on the trail in to it. I didn't get away till noon, but the targets were within an hour's drive, and the weather was perfect. The trail to the small lake was a steep climb from the main Logging road, but not really challenging, with only a few shallow cross ditches and some small patches of snow in shaded areas. I found the right turns to make on Gaia, and reached the lake at 2 pm. I walked around some, looking for tracks, but found only some boot prints and dog tracks. The lake was still iced over, with a layer of snow on top of that, so I didn't venture out onto it, just took some photos and ate a snack, before taking a different route down the mountain towards Harrison Lake. This route was a ;little more challenging, with more snow patches, some washouts that made it very narrow in places, and a couple of dozen blowdowns, that someone had just recently cut through, leaving barely enough room to squeeze the H3 through. Once back on the main FSR, I continued N to the turnoff for the bay I was seeking. As I reached it, 3 trucks approached from the opposite direction, and turned down the trail, so I tagged on the end as no. 4 in the little convoy. In 15 minutes we were down on the lakeshore at a lovely little bay that was the site of a logging camp and booming spot to tow the logs out 40 or 50 years ago. No buildings are left, just an earthen pier and some rusty boiler parts. I chatted with the 4x4 group for a while, and then followed them back up to the main road, and then headed home. No evidence of Sasquatch was seen, but it was a beautiful day to be in the woods.
    6 points
  28. Greetings to Hiflier and to all. Yes, I am still alive and well. The PhD program is very rigorous and therefore I don't have much time to post anymore, but I do still lurk fairly often. Spring break will be dedicated to field research related to the existence of Sasquatch, with an emphasis on locating the remains of a specimen. For this purpose the archaeological method should prove quite useful, and archaeology is a regretfully much neglected science in the field of Bigfoot research. Hopefully I can help to change this. I look forward to the opportunity where I can post consistently once again. Cheers.
    6 points
  29. I'm sure it can be terribly disappointing if someone's principal objective is to prove to the world they exist. Undeniable, fully-verifiable proof. Me--I could give a hoot. What keeps me out in the woods day-after-day for weeks, months, and years on end is the desire for a sighting. I'll take a sighting that is a fleeting moment or a mere glimpse. No need to tell anyone, no need to prove to anyone, no need to document, although that would be fantastic. The satifisfaction I saw one of God's magnificent creatures is all I ask. There is no frustration whatsoever with failure. Fieldwork provides me the opportunity to be out in the woods, experiencing nature in all its glory and gloom, while putting myself in the position to see one. In many ways it's a mirror of life itself. If one can only find pleasure setting an objective and conquering it, sadly you'll miss the absolute joy of the journey.
    6 points
  30. Merry Christmas to one and all. Even Scrooge has turned kinder, caring about others. We all can do it! Here’s a pic I used for my Christmas cards—the tranquility of the Charles River outside Boston.
    6 points
  31. With no disrespect meant, I 100% disagree. Zooming in shows none of that to me. Frankly I can’t even grasp how you claim to see features such as brows in this picture. I’d personally chalk that up to pareidolia.
    5 points
  32. Here's a cool sight, and was sitting over by where I park my car, a rare albino Diamondback Rattlesnake.
    5 points
  33. I went out on a group 4x4 run this weekend, to a trail I hadn't driven in about 30 years, called the Whipsaw. It's rated as 1 of the top 10 off road routes in N. America, and it didn't disappoint on that level, though there was no sign of Sasquatch anywhere along the 75 km length. There was lots of dust, mud, ruts, rocks, and mosquitoes to make it a real adventure, though. Most of the route is along a 6'000 ft ridge, in alpine parkland, and the wildflowers were in full bloom. We camped the first night at a small lake in a little spruce hollow, and completed the run the second day. Every truck made it through without breaking anything, though there were minor dents and scratches, and one that kept overheating on the second day. The scenery is spectacular!
    5 points
  34. The rig is looking sweet, norseman, I'm glad you're finally getting to test it out. I took a short run out to a local mountain yesterday afternoon that had been behind a locked gate for the last year. The logging operation is now finished, and the gate is open, so I had to check it out. It's a spot I posted about 2 years ago, with a hikers cabin near the peak and a great view over the central Fraser Valley. I was up there for 3 hours, and saw only 1 hiker coming down and 1 4x4 that arrived at the lookout about 20 minutes after I did. I saw 1 grouse, and several fresh bear scat piles on the drive up, so for the short hike to the cabin I strapped on my bear spray. Spring bear season ended on the 15th, so I wasn't carrying the 300 WSM. I sat at the table near the cabin for a sandwich, and a few pics of the view, then headed home for supper. It was the warmest day so far this year, 34 C, or about 86 F. The white peak on the horizon in the last photo is Mt. Baker, in Wa., reported to have the word's highest single years snowfall in 1999, 30m, or about 100'.
    5 points
  35. It has been a while since I have been on here. Lots of life and health changes have slowed me down. But. I will start trying to catch all up in this thread over the next few weeks. I can start with a few photos of my finds. I have many new visuals and happenings I hope you will like. I will try to pick up where my book Forest Friends of the Night, left off.
    5 points
  36. 5 points
  37. This is one of the best footprints I've ever seen. It was found in northeastern Iowa a couple of years ago by a friend of mine. The cast was shown to both Cliff and Dr. Meldrum and they were really impressed to the point where Cliff had a copy made for this museum. What makes this so impressive is the dermal ridges can be seen and shows up in the cast. First question, can we rule out this is a human track? Based on the size, it is obviously a juvenile print. It was found after a rainy night approximately 1 1/2 miles from the nearest dwelling. It was in the 50's overnight so I would conclude that a child wouldn't be wandering the Iowa countryside barefoot in those temperatures so far from any type of house. The dimensions of the print are also outside of human ratios. The heel to ball ratio in humans is approximately 1:1.5 whereas this one is closer to 1:1 based on my research. Caveat that I'm definitely no expert on human foot morphology so I would welcome those with more knowledge on the topic. There were other prints of this size but this was the best one of the bunch. No larger footprints were found in the area. Fun stuff.
    5 points
  38. The rain that was forecast for today held off, so after lunch I grabbed the Hummer keys and headed out to a nearby mountain trail. I had recently heard, through a local 4x4 forum, that a branch road off a well known FSR was now open, after being gated for years. I got there about 2, and found the narrow road to be in pretty good condition, due to recent logging near the summit, but right from the start it was steep enough to be best climbed in low range. At about 2 km up, I saw a very scenic small waterfall, and stopped for the photo, of course. At km 3 the grade lessened to a more normal climb rate, and I continued all the way to the recent logging show at the end of a nice hanging valley at 800M el.(about 2500'). There were still patches of snow, but the road was bare, with a thin layer of mud from the snow melt, so I had my eyes peeled for tracks, but only saw lots of bear scat, probably from last fall, before the snows came. After a break to stretch my legs and have a snack, while glassing the clearcut, and a talus slope at the foot of an impressive rock bluff, I headed back down the trail, exploring a couple of older deactivated branches along the way, and taking a few more scenic pics. Since the start of this route is only 40 minutes from my home, I was back in time for dinner at 6.
    5 points
  39. I disagree with you there. I think you could count with two hands the number of committed groups who hit the field repeatedly and methodically and that is the problem.
    5 points
  40. I love talking about what I carry! I love gear We usually are waayyy out in the woods, so I carry a full kit. Things I wear: a bushcraft knife (BPS Knives, carbon steel full tang knife), a Garmin InReach Mini, a Bic lighter, 6 Bigfoot Bushcraft fire plugs, some sort of pocketknife, a ferro rod, appropriate clothing and footwear for the season, a hat for the season, a sturdy leather belt, at least one hiking pole and my Beretta gun. I am working on getting a chest rig. I'll keep a minimum kit in it, that will always be on me, if we step out of the truck for a short walk and don't want to carry everything. It will have the Heatsheet, paracord, matches, an empty water bladder and water purification tabs, a mini flashlight and a 500-calorie Payday bar. I carry it all in a 2-lb Outdoor Vitals Shadowlight pack, which I love! Fire: Tinder kit with a few waxy fire starters, a few more BB fire plugs, waterproof Uco matches, some charcloth. In a mylar scent-free bag. Water: A Sawyer Squeeze filter and extra bladder, a Lifestraw water bottle OR a plastic bottle of water that fits the Squeeze, some water purification tabs. In a mylar scent-free bag. Shelter: A Coalcracker Bushcraft 10x10 silpoly tarp, 4 hanks of paracord, a SOL Heatsheet for a ground cloth and merino wool socks. In winter, I add a SOL bivy bag, puffy jacket, silk balaclava and vegetable plastic sacks from the grocery store, a silpoly rain poncho and sometimes rain pants and mittens; in summer just an additional long-sleeve merino Smartwool shirt. I have a Nemo 2P tent, but I'm determined to learn to use tarps. If I'm in a campground, I'll use the tent (or if I KNOW it's extra buggy where we're going) and a sleeping pad for my old bones. In a dry bag, except for the tarp, which has its own silpoly bag. First Aid: First aid/CPR/AED certification, advil/tylenol/aspirin, poison oak wipes, lip balm, bug repellent in summer, sunscreen, hand lotion (I have ezcema), a tiny eye drop bottle, alcohol pads, antibiotic cream, a limited selection of bandages and pads and leukotape. In a mylar scent-free bag. Cook Kit: Titanium mug & spork, MSR pocket Rocket & fuel cannister OR an Esbit stove & tabs, 2 Stowaway Gourmet meals (the best), a big 500-calorie Payday bar, a bouillon cube, 4 packets of coffee, I cocoa packet, another Bic lighter, a mini towel and my lunch for the day. If I'm fishing, I bring a tiny packet of salt, pepper, oil and a lemon pepper mix. Sometimes I bring my Kuska wooden mug and my teapot, both of which I love and don't mind carrying. The food is in a mylar scent-free bag and all is inside a dry bag. The teapot has its own bag. Poop Kit: Toilet paper, a few wipes and a ziplock, hand sanitizer, soap sheets from REI, in a mylar scent-free bag, a titanium trowel, and a Kula Cloth on my pack. Electronics: A FLIR camera, phone, audio recorders, a headlamp, extra batteries, all the cords and an Anker Powercore battery. In summer, I'll add a rolling solar panel. I have a tiny button light on the outside of my pack. In a dry bag. Misc: Snacks! The smallest Silky saw, a hank of rope sometimes, a tiny notebook and pencil, red bandana, a small candle, a 5-inch piece of a hacksaw, reading glasses, signal mirror, paper maps or screenshots of where we are going, a compass, my fishing license, my wallet and a REI foam seat pad. Sometimes I bring my Helinox One chair and my hatchet if we'll be close to the truck or very far away from it. Sometimes I bring a fishing pole and a tiny bit of gear. I always bring one or two pretty stones as a gift for the bigfoots if we get any interactions or find anything that says to us "they were here". In NorthWind's truck aka when I don't drive, I bring a carry-on with a full change of clothing, more food and first aid supplies, a solar light and a small battery lantern, a battery/winding radio, a small grill, leather work gloves, an emergency tarp and more paracord, a toothbrush, hair ties and whatever I've tucked into the nooks and crannies. And in winter, either a sleeping bag or a wool blanket. In my truck, which is old as dirt, I also carry an extensive first aid kit, another hatchet and sharpening stones, a saw, shovel, extra gas and water and fishing poles and gear and 2 wool blankets and 2 sleeping bags. Did I forget anything? Now you know what I'm carrying in all my videos.
    5 points
  41. I separately select items based on my particular needs which can be different than others. The most important are those items which will prevent death from occuring prioritized based on time or the nature of the calamity. Here's my "Dirty Dozen": 1) A way to get help - PLB and Satellite messenger (the latter might not be needed if you are in cell service) to call in the cavalry 2) A way to stop the bleeding - 2 Combat gauze and an Israeli bandage 3) A way to get/stay warm - 2 or 3mil painters tarp and space blanket - see Dave Canterbury video below for how to build shelter 4) A way to get/stay dry - Goretex/eVent jacket and pants and the same tarp 5) A way to make fire - 2 Bic lighters, a ferro rod, tinder 6) A way to have potable water - 2 filters 7) A way to see - 2 flashlights (small) and spare batteries 8) Two knives (neck and bushcraft) 9) Backpacker's Buck saw 10) Map and compass 11) Paracord 12) Power bank Edited - Dave Canterbury's Pathfinder's school is located in Ohio and thus he designed this course for Eastern Woodlands. The concept is universal and will work anywhere where you are cold and could potentially become hypothermic. He has fantastic videos regarding survival techniques. I considered traveling to Ohio to take one of his courses but couldn't work it out in my schedule. Here is the calender of courses offered this year: https://www.selfrelianceoutfitters.com/pages/pathfinder-survival-school-calendar
    5 points
  42. Exploring new wilderness areas (hiking, camping, backpacking) and trying to do citizen science to collect evidence on the reality of these creatures is positive. However, it is all fun and games until darkness falls and you end up with an encounter that scares you to death or psychologically/spiritually transforms you in a negative way. What happens when the dog catches the car? Most people who tell me that they want to see a sasquatch, say that they prefer to see it from the safety of their car or from 300 yards away from a group setting. Rarely do people tell me that they want to see a sasquatch when they are camping solo in the middle of a wilderness area. What if you spend 30 years with this hobby and never see one or gather compelling evidence (that improves the current situation)? I think that situation would still be positive if your intent was to have fun in the wilderness and enjoy the outdoors. It would not be positive if you neglected your family, friends, work, etc. in the pursuit of an unbalanced obsession with the search for proof.
    5 points
  43. Lol. What looked like tracks on the mud, but no snow. We already had our two weeks of cold weather. The area has a torn up all to heck with all of the storms, so there’s a lot of debris on the ground. We also found a twisted tree a hour or two before. I didn’t see what it was…it stayed right outside of my light. So…I am not going to say ‘Bigfoot bluff charged me”, but I will say that I experienced something that matches up with what other people have described as a bluff charge. Rather, my partner did. As soon as a moved about 20 feet from her, it sounded like a freight train busting through the woods right at her. Got to the edge of the trees and just stopped. I rushed towards it and nothing was there. No deer, coyote, or even bear makes that much noise here when moving. Honestly, it didn’t sound like a living being coming through the brush. I thought that a tree was falling for a split second…before my brain processed that it was something busting through the trees, not down into them. Again, I didn’t see it…but, it was pretty close to how people describe a charge. I am in the woods at night weekly. I know how sometimes a small creature can sound much bigger in the woods at night. It wasn’t like that. Rather, it didn’t SEEM like that. Who knows? We could have startled the world’s largest woodchuck and he just hit every branch and rock just perfectly to give the impression of greater size. It was definitely something that we haven’t experienced before.
    5 points
  44. I get the general way of thinking and don't overly disagree, but i just don't think you can be bringing in religion to this subject as it obviously brings up geographical issues and a whole world of questioning that simply can't be answered objectively.
    5 points
  45. Wow, that's both cool and creepy! I've seen bigfoot fingerprints before, and they look just like those. Glad you got a photo! Update. July 5, 2020 = Our FLIR sighting in the Oregon Cascades. 2 bigfoots, about 100 yards or less in the woods, doing the typical tree peek thing. I very clearly saw it lean out from behind the tree - shoulder, head, shoulder. We've been past this spot often, on our way to other locations. We got it on FLIR, but it's shaky compared to what I saw. I had my arm settled on the open door of my truck, and panned around, very steady. I have zero doubt about what I saw. When we recorded, NorthWind was standing recording with the FLIR camera, and it's much shakier. Then, in October 2020, we were at a lake, and something stared across a river at us from inside an 8-foot-tall culvert filled with 4 inches of running water, while we stared back at it wondering who or what it was. We hurried over to that side, but by the time we got there, it was long gone. I count it as a daylight sighting, but I can't prove it, of course. I didn't think to photograph it, and I kick myself daily about that. We've found hundreds of footprints, dozens of track lines, and all the other things that bigfoots supposedly do. Can't say with 100% certainty that its bigfoots doing all this, since I've never seen them do it, but we hope to! We're slowly accumulating gear to that end, and you can see it all on our sub-forum here. We are out there nearly every weekend searching and exploring this mystery. We have a dozen research spots and are methodically gathering data from all this and it's beginning to pay off. I just wish more people actually cared. I love hearing everyone's stories.
    5 points
  46. SSR Open Dataset (1/1/2022 Release) Entire Dataset: SSR-All-1-1-2022.csv Class A Sightings: SSR-ClassA-1-1-2022.csv Class B Sightings: SSR-ClassB-1-1-2022.csv Report Score 6+: SSR-Repscore=6+_1-1-2022.csv
    5 points
  47. I'll get us started with my first submission. I will not be re-using any of the previous BFF researcher of the year material. For my submissions I will only be using data acquired from 2021 & 2022. This site is an on going investigation site from 2021, now that we've retrieved enough data to satisfy us we're comfortable sharing that the "wineberry" site is actually home of the Polk Gap Monster, a local name for bigfoot that has amassed sightings for over 100 years. Tb
    5 points
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