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Bigfoot, Friend Or Foe?


Lake County Bigfooot
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I would think just standing out there with a video cam would get you the next Patty, or keep em at bay. Or a good therm. This is going to be ruined, but it also 'tells' you how to attract squatches.

 

They are going to have to get rid of most of the plants that attract the deer. These will be torn out in a few weeks if that. If they listen. Otherwise....

 

Fast food ruins squatches also, apparently.

Edited by Wag
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From what I have read. It was the snow peas they planted to draw the deer, which in turn drew in the bigfoot. I thought they got rid of all the plant's and the problem stopped

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regarding the last quote from WSA above, I guess you don't buy into the David Paulides "missing persons 411" suggestion.

A close reading of the 411 books (especially the latest one), as well as Paulides' blog posts on the NABS website, pretty clearly indicate, IMO, that he suspects something other than bigfoot is responsible for for the majority of the disappearances. I don't think he would rule out bigfoot or bigfoot-like creatures (an important distinction) being involved somehow, just that they aren't the proverbial "brains" of the operation.
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I would think just standing out there with a video cam would get you the next Patty, or keep em at bay. Or a good therm. This is going to be ruined, but it also 'tells' you how to attract squatches.

 

They are going to have to get rid of most of the plants that attract the deer. 

 

Deer: I think any grazing area suitable for horses & cattle is also good for deer,

but maybe better for them if spotted with (fruit) trees. If you have chickens & feed

them scratch, the deer will smell that & join the feed.  They will also nose their way

into your feed room if it isn't locked. 

     Austrian snow peas, I hadn't heard of. But if that's a special attractant for deer, 

good to know. Now we all know how to build a Bigfoot magnet. 

   Knowing this, shouldn't take more'n a year to get your specimens. :)

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Does anyone know if the Honobia home owners ever conducted a recorded interview? The show I meant to refer to in the initial posts

was the Sasquatch Chronicles with Will Jevning, not Sasquatch Encounters, sorry for any confusion.

 

Concerning the Paulides books, I have heard him imply bigfoot were causing some of the incidents in his mind.  He referred to several

occasions where young victims described being taken away by a monkey, or gorilla.  Very creepy how the people were almost always

found without shoes and socks, like a strategy to prevent the victims escape!  Often drug upslope, like an ambush predator had taken

them from above.

 

I am in the camp of we don't know as much as we pretend to know about this creature, and I suspect that one day one of us researchers

will go missing....Cliff Barackman said he would be willing to take one for the team, and that being mauled by a Squatch would be the

ultimate adrenalin rush...that's one ride I would prefer not to take....

Edited by Lake County Bigfooot
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Deer: I think any grazing area suitable for horses & cattle is also good for deer,

but maybe better for them if spotted with (fruit) trees. If you have chickens & feed

them scratch, the deer will smell that & join the feed. They will also nose their way

into your feed room if it isn't locked.

Austrian snow peas, I hadn't heard of. But if that's a special attractant for deer,

good to know. Now we all know how to build a Bigfoot magnet.

Knowing this, shouldn't take more'n a year to get your specimens. :)

This is not to bust your chops, but that is incorrect. There are quite a few things that cattle and horses will willingly eat that deer will not touch, even when starving to death. Fescue is one of them and is, by far, the most prominent pasture grass in a very large part of the United States. Over a huge part of the country, there are at least four to five times more acres of fescue pastures than everything else combined.

Another is soybean straw either baled or right out of a freshly combined field, which horses and cattle will eat if there's nothing better available, and deer will not touch.

There are other common ones that I can't think of right now, but there are LOTS of things commonly planted to attract deer, and snow peas is just one of them. I've hunted over food plots planted just for deer for over 40 years, and much of that time was in booger territory, and I've never seen a BF on or in close proximity to one. I'm not saying it won't happen, it just hasn't happened to me, yet. But I have seen BF in fescue pastures and hay fields, passing through, and I believe they ambush cattle and horses in pastures.

However, BF do ambush deer on their ways to and from foot plots. My belief is that deer, being smaller and much lighter than horses and cattle, are much more maneuverable and harder to catch in an open field, so ambushing deer in a wooded or brushy area is the preferred way BF catch them.

Edited by Coonbo
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Well, the very first close-up encounter I ever for sure had with BF (you can read about it here: http://www.gcbro.com/ALcolbert001.html) was due to what we thought was cattle rustling and deer poaching happening on the back of our farm, near the big woods along the river. I later figured out that it was due to BF, at least some of it was, I am certain. The deer kills were definitely BF. The problem with being sure about the cattle kills and disappearances was that we never found some of them, although we leased pasture land next to ours and I never searched the woods along the river on that property and there was no way I could cover every bit of the woods along the river on our farm. Plus, we found at least two cows that had been shot and killed.

 

There were calves that disappeared that we never found, but the ones that we did find would usually be ripped open and the entrails removed, sometimes a leg, or legs, would be ripped off. Most would have broken tails and the head would be twisted around with its neck presumably broken. Unfortunately, at the time I didn't know to check and see what, if any, internal organs were missing. We didn't have coyotes in the area at the time, so the carcasses would be in quite good condition if we found them soon enough.

 

We would occasionally find a larger heifer dead with its tail twisted and sometimes broken and it's neck broken, but not ripped open. I eventually came to the conclusion that these heifers had been violated. (And NO, I did not take any samples for DNA analysis. This was the late 70's. But I would attempt to take samples now if I had the opportunity.)  We would occasionally find cows with wounds on their head, necks, and/or tails, and some of them would be very flighty and crazy acting. I believe these were wounds received while being attacked.

 

There are numerous reports of horses acting crazy and scared when BF are nearby. One of the reasons, I and others believe, is because they violate them. I have reason to believe that this happened to my mare, unfortunately. And don't ask me to elaborate further.

 

I know that this isn't what you expected to hear.   And I don't recall ever reading of this being revealed in print on a public forum, and I seriously debated whether or not to share this bit of dark intel.   But, this is a subject that quite a few of the more experienced BF investigators have known about for years, but only discussed among ourselves.

Edited by Coonbo
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Wow, Coonbo.  Gotta process that.  It's a behavior I hadn't considered, but don't doubt.  It raises other questions in my mind that I want to ask, but I'll hold onto them for now.  Thank you.

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