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Expedition Bigfoot :Travel Channel

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SWWASAS
10 minutes ago, hiflier said:

 

Might be best not to wait that long then. Fire at will in defiance and just remember to save one for yourself. Hmmm....

 

"I know what you're thinking: 'Did he fire six shots or only five?' Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement, I've kinda lost track myself. But being this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world, and would blow your head clean off, you've got to ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do you, punk?"- Dirty Harry

Your post reminded me of one statement in the show last night.      Did you catch the "Sound of Silence" comment.     I was expecting someone to start singing "Hello Darkness my old friend"     I had no idea that part of "The Graduate" was about bigfooting.  

 

Yes I have to modify DIrty Harry's monologue for the benefit of any criminal that breaks in.      Since I only have a 357 should I say "one of the most powerful handguns in the world"  or does it loose something doing that?

Edited by SWWASAS

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hiflier
27 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

Since I only have a 357 should I say "one of the most powerful handguns in the world"  or does it loose something doing that?

 

NOT AT ALL! Doesn't have to be an S&W 29 to do the job. Hmmm......S&W/SWWASAS. Kinda has a nice ring to it :) 

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wiiawiwb
2 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

Exactly that worries me about attempting to use a too small handgun on an adult male bigfoot.    "Oh you shot that thing at me?"  the bigfoot growls as he wrenches the gun out of my broken fingers and empties it into my gut.  

 

Fast and light means you better be an expert shooter to hit the smaller target. Heavy and powerful means you aim dead center at a massive target. I'll choose the latter.

Edited by wiiawiwb

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wiiawiwb
1 hour ago, SWWASAS said:

I would be curious if someone with FLIR gear could reproduce that round heat blob presented in the show.  It seems more like an artificial source of heat than an animal.    I am thinking propane heat lamp.    They said that the heat signature of a bigfoot would be different because of body fur muting the heat profile.      However that red blob sort of goes against that argument unless the bigfoot had a naked belly.   

 

I plan on doing my own recreation in early Spring unless I head out some weekend this winter hiking with a buddy.  I have a Pulsar XQ versus XP line so I'll have to account for the difference in native magnification. Instinct tells me I will not be able to recreate the blooming in red hot we saw on EB but I'll remain impartial and time will tell.

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SWWASAS
52 minutes ago, wiiawiwb said:

 

I plan on doing my own recreation in early Spring unless I head out some weekend this winter hiking with a buddy.  I have a Pulsar XQ versus XP line so I'll have to account for the difference in native magnification. Instinct tells me I will not be able to recreate the blooming in red hot we saw on EB but I'll remain impartial and time will tell.

Correct me if I am wrong but since the deer was in white,   doesn't the red and yellow blob indicate the temperature of a much higher source of heat or at least give a relative relationship of the temperatures involved related to the white deer?     What if it was 20 degrees warmer than the deer?    Bigfoot just get out of the hot tub?    I don't know a lot about that IR gear at all.  

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NorthWind
5 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

Correct me if I am wrong but since the deer was in white,   doesn't the red and yellow blob indicate the temperature of a much higher source of heat or at least give a relative relationship of the temperatures involved related to the white deer?     What if it was 20 degrees warmer than the deer?    Bigfoot just get out of the hot tub?    I don't know a lot about that IR gear at all.  

I think it depends on the manufacturer of the device and the palette that you choose. It's looking at temperature, not IR at all. It doesn't pick up or use light for detection...the only light involved is being directed at your eye so you can see. 

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bipedalist
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I R is usually used in conjunction with night vision I thought, not thermal, that was how they were filming production wise like in Finding Bigfoot with the IR backpack frame

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hiflier
22 minutes ago, NorthWind said:

I think it depends on the manufacturer of the device and the palette that you choose. It's looking at temperature, not IR at all. It doesn't pick up or use light for detection...the only light involved is being directed at your eye so you can see. 

 

18 minutes ago, bipedalist said:

I R is usually used in conjunction with night vision I thought, not thermal, that was how they were filming production wise like in Finding Bigfoot with the IR backpack frame

 

Both correct. Thermal devices only detect relative surface temperature differentials. After much research, I'm going to be ordering a 50:1 heat thermometer. The ratio means that at 50 ft. the detector will focus average an area 1 ft. in diameter. The advantage being it will give an actual temperature reading...day or night. My FLIR TK Scout does a good job imaging objects but doesn't say what the temperature of objects are. For example, a rock at night that's been absorbing heat all day could give a false positive of say, white hot in a thermal imager, and look like the humped back of an animal.

 

A follow up with the thermal thermometer would show the rock to be perhaps 75 degrees, which would be well below that of a living creature's body temp. This is all about being sure of what it is that I'm detecting. Rocks are stationary objects and animals can be stationary objects as well. Ideally, a team of two or three people outfitted with these different technologies would make things easier. One on thermal (recording), one on NV (recording), and one on the thermometer (can store temperature data). Two of the devices can be effective in the daytime in cool surroundings (less than perhaps 85 degrees). It means that in the daytime the third person can....uh.....COOK, yeah, that's it, that's the ticket :) 

Edited by hiflier

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ShadowBorn

 

Quote

An infrared illuminator, or IR illuminator, is a tool that emits light in the infrared spectrum. Infrared light, or infrared radiation, has wavelengths longer than visible light and is usually experienced as heat. Infrared radiation is invisible to the human eye, but to night vision devices, an IR illuminator functions like a flashlight.

Russel must have changed the setting on the thermal when he spotted on the deer. What ever he spotted with the thermal that had a hot spot on the belly part could not have been a bigfoot. The only thing that I can think of is that it was a person wearing a coat and had his /hers front zipper unzipped. Hence the heat source coming from the center of the mass. The creatures that I have seen were covered all over including the belly part of them. So this does not make much sense to why it would be loosing so much heat from it's vital organs. Now I am not familiar with the weather in Oregon but have seen Russel pan on the other humans on the team and they look similar to what we see what he captured on his thermal. 

 

 

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ShadowBorn
3 minutes ago, hiflier said:

A follow up with the thermal thermometer would show the rock to be perhaps 75 degrees, which would be well below that of a living creature's body temp. This is all about being sure of what it is that I'm detecting. Rocks are stationary objects and animals can be stationary objects as well. Ideally, a team of two or three people outfitted with these different technologies would make things easier. One on thermal (recording), one on NV (recording), and one on the thermometer (can store temperature data). Tow of the devices can be effective in the daytime as well in cool surroundings (less than perhaps 85 degrees). It means that in the daytime the third person can.........COOK, yeah, that's it, that's the ticket :) 

The other idea would be is to push towards the creature and get the creature to move where you want it to move. As long as you do not make it feel like it is being trapped.  If you are a good marksman you would be able to get a bead on the creature and make a shot as long as the other observers could clear it not to be a real human being.  It would be a wham bam thank you mam " specimen".  The Dr. be having a great day then and would be known for the discovery of this creature. No one would need to know about the shooter. I believe that that should be kept silent.  Some times fame is not a great thing . 

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Huntster
7 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

 ........Oh I thought I saw the hand grip of a side arm sticking out of Mayors pack at one point.   She probably felt she needed it because of the other actors.  

 

7 hours ago, bipedalist said:

^ Well she said she had six kids to come back to so that might explain the sidearm if you saw one........

 

I haven't seen the show yet, but it sounds like I need to just to get a gander at this Dr. Mayor. She sounds hot.

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wiiawiwb
1 hour ago, SWWASAS said:

Correct me if I am wrong but since the deer was in white,   doesn't the red and yellow blob indicate the temperature of a much higher source of heat or at least give a relative relationship of the temperatures involved related to the white deer?     What if it was 20 degrees warmer than the deer?    Bigfoot just get out of the hot tub?    I don't know a lot about that IR gear at all.  

Red hot is notoriously unreliable in my opinion. I never use it so I don't have a lot of experience with it.  You would think the red blob's surface temperature would have to be hotter than the deer, right?  What we don't know is whether the thermal was recording in red hot then got switched to white hot to record the deer. Pulsar gives you a color palette from which to choose, let's say red hot. The default is white hot so the mere press of a button allows you to instantly switch between red hot and white hot. Was that done?

 

Here is a video recorded in red hot of a guy walking and the palms of his hands are red yet his arms are white.  Why are his arms so white?  If we could be certain the deer wasn't shot in white hot then we can make some assumptions about the surface temperature of the red blob and that of the deer. 

 

Edited by wiiawiwb

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bipedalist
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You see some red at the arterial locations near skin where there should be heat, wrist, temple, maybe backside of inner elbow.  Not knowing ambient temp hard to know about face nose area.  Must have been fairly warm out.  Can't figure out why top of head not red. 

The red hot feature makes no sense to me generally though, I prefer the white hot. 

Edited by bipedalist

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hiflier
40 minutes ago, Huntster said:

I need to just to get a gander at this Dr. Mayor. She sounds hot.

 

You would know that if you had a thermal imager ;) 

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Airdale

People with normal circulation will have warm palms. The gentleman may have more hair on top of his head than the crown, that could account for the hot patch showing from the back.

 

Had another thought WRT cinnabar mine and the children's cemetary; sickness and/or death linked to the mineral would most likely be suffered by the miners rather than result in widespread juvenile deaths. On the other hand, deadly epidemics with children as the primary victims were unfortunately not uncommon in those small frontier communities.

 

One interesting thing relating to the light being shined on this series by the contributors to this thread is my wife's reaction; she's become a bit interested in the subject of bigfoot periferally through me, but learning the truth behind the production has seriously teed her off. She spent her career in commercial lending and job creation, the last ten years as executive director of a non-profit community development corporation, and she does not cotton to deception in any way, shape or form. We've been watching the series together, but after showing her the photo of the truck on the ranch's website last week as well as the true Google Earth layout, she wasn't interested last night, reading a book while I fought to stay awake. Discussing it at supper tonight she said "I hate being lied to!"

 

For anyone not familiar with it that would like to watch a good cryptid production, check out Josh Gates' "Expedition Unknown: Hunt for the Yeti". It's a four part series with some real adventure, humor, altitude sickness and even following a trackway through a blizzard in Bhutan until a pack of wolves intervenes. It's availablel on Amazon Prime.

Edited by Airdale
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